THE INVISIBLE BRIDGE: SOURCE NOTES
NOTES_1-8NOTES_9-16NOTES_17-24NOTES_25-32
SOME GUIDELINES FOR USING THESE NOTES:
Google’s newspaper archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers) is an essential component of what you will find below. Wherever possible, I use citations that make the source accessible to the reader. For example, for articles that appeared in the New York Times Week in Review, I link to one of the many newspapers available on Google that ran a syndicated version of the Week in Review. Columnists that originated in, say, the Washington Post, like Joseph Alsop’s, are linked to in their syndicated versions available on Google. Columns often appear a day or several days after they did in the originating newspaper; I chose to cite the date corresponding to the linked item, not the item in its original form.

It is my preference as a social historian to use the news wires as a source, because that is how the majority of Americans would have encountered this information, instead of sources like the Washington Post and New York Times. Papers like the Times and Post are available on databases like Proquest Historical Newspapers, either from university libraries for those who have access to them, or for a fee. When I link to a wire article, I do not include the article title, because those vary from newspaper to newspaper.

At least one newspaper that had their archives on Google when I did the research, and one that close covered the statewide activities of Ronald Reagan, the Modesto Bee, is no longer available through Google. In several cases I linked to the articles I originally found in the Bee through the site Newspapers.com, which charges for access.

Time had its archives available online for free for much of the period in which I research the book. It no longer does, but I include the links anyway for subscribers.

In the vast majority of cases I link to the book on Google Books from which I originally derived information, usually in its hard-copy form. But where the source is not available through Google Books I have sometimes elected to link to books that are so available. I have not generally linked to sources that are available through Google Books in “snippet” form, which only only a few lines to be viewed.

My effort here is about intellectual democracy, in the spirit of the open source software movement. I welcome messages about errors, omissions, broken links and any questions at nixonland@gmail.com.

—Rick Perlstein

 

ABBREVIATIONS:

AEP: Anne Edwards Papers

AP: Associated Press

CST: Chicago Sun-Times

CT: Chicago Tribune

DHH: Deaver & Hannaford Papers, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

ENIR: Rowland Evans and Robert Novak, “Inside Report” column

HSCPCA: “Hearings before the Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session: Watergate and Related Activities”

GFLM: Gerald Ford Library and Museum

LWL: Letters to Lorraine Wagner, Reagan Ranch Center museum, Santa Barbara, California

NYT: New York Times

NYTM: New York Times magazine

PCM: Paley Center for Media

RNL: Richard Nixon Library

RNLPOW: Richard Nixon Library, POW papers

RRRH: Ronald Reagan radio broadcasts, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

TNR: The New Republic

UCSB: Presidential speeches collected at American Presidency Project, University of California–Santa Barbara

USNWR: U.S. News & World Report

VNA: Vanderbilt University Television News Archive

VPOWMIA: The Vietnam-Era Prisoner-of-War/Missing-in-Action Database <ck>

UPI: United Press International

WP: Washington Post

WSJ: Wall Street Journal

 

 

PREFACE

 

xii “liver, kidney, brains, and heart” NBC News, March 16, 1973.

xiv “For the first time”Today Show, February 22, 1973, VNA.

xiv “[i]f the Bicentennial” TNR, May 3, 1975.

xiv “the greatest immorality”Sixty Minutes, December 14, 1975, PCM.

xiv “The American people” For Pius XII see Collier’s magazine, March 30, 1945. For Reagan’s quotations of him see here and here.

xv “well-meaning individuals” UPI, May 1, 1973.

xv “Nation’s Hunger” Monica Schneider, “The American Bicentennial: Celebration, Cerebration and the Suppression of Complex Discourse,” honors thesis, Oberlin University, 2003; AP, July 5, 1976 . “The feeling of the day” Elizabeth Drew, American Journal: The Events of 1976 (New York: Random House, 1977), p. 281.

xvi ““Always articulate” Ralph Keyes interviews in possession of author.

xvii “I met you” Harry Von Bulow, God and Ronald Reagan: God Moves in the Affairs of Men (Bloomington, IN: Author House, 2006), p. 105.

xvii “Don’t rescue me” Anne Edwards,Early Reagan: The Rise to Power (New York: William & Morrow, 1985), p. 65 ; The Dixonian, 1928, Dixon Public Library.

xviii “I think dad” Maureen Reagan, First Father, First Daughter: A Memoir (New York: Little, Brown, 1989), p. 209. “because my folks” Ibid., p. 94.

xviii “I had been taught” Patti Davis, The Way I See It: An Autobiography (New York: Putnam, 1992), p. 10.

xix “I believe unequivocally” Debate between James Carville and Liz Cheney, June 10, 2009, RealClearPolitics.com.

xix “Like all Americans” “Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Republican National Convention in Tampa,” UCSB, August 30, 2012.

xix “Ours is a nation” Juan Castro, Keynote address, Democratic National Convention, September 4, 2012. “Every day they” Michelle Obama, Democratic National Convention, September 4, 2012 . “we keep our eyes” “Remarks Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina,” UCSB, September 6, 2012

xix “America is the greatest” ABC News National Security Blog, July 17, 2013.

 

 

CHAPTER ONE: SMALL AND SUSPICIOUS CIRCLES ><5:30-5:58><12:20-1:31>

 

1 “You are come”Nina Silber, The Romance of Reunion: Northerners and the South, 1865-1900 (Charlotte: University of North Carolina Press, 1997), p. 55. “Does he really imagine”: Ibid., p. 62.

1 “that we have concluded”: UCSB, January 23, 1973.

1 “it wasn’t like 1945”: Mike Royko, For the Love of Mike: More of the of the Best of Mike Royko, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002), p. 167.

2 “The returning POWs” Memorandum of Conversation, Nixon, Richardson, Scowcroft, February 15, 1973, 1:00 p.m., GFLM (pdf).

2 “GOD BLESS AMERICA” UPI, February 12, 1973. See also Vernon E. Davis, The Long Road Home: U.S. Prisoner of War Policy and Planning in Southeast Asia (Washington, D.C.: Office of the Secretary, 2000), p. 496-503, 517; ABC, NBC, and CBS news broadcasts, February 12 and 14, 1973; LAT, “POW Thanks Nixon,” February 12, 1973, p. 1, and “Celebrated AF Pilot Gets Jubilant Greeting,’ February 12, 1973, p. 2; “Aircraft Leave to Pick Up P.O.W.’s,” NYT, February 12, 1973, p. 57; “Nixon Talks With Colonel; Calls the Release ‘Moving,’” NYT, February 13, 1973, p. 15, and “First Prisoner Release Is Completed; Arrival at Clark Base Is Filled With Emotion,” February 13, 1973, NYT, p. 1; “First 2 P.O.W.’s Land in U.S., ‘Grateful, Overwhelmed, Proud,’” NYT, February 14, 1973, “Ex-Prisoners Rushing for Gifts, Ice Cream, Home,” NYT, February 15, 1973, p. 1; Gergen to Scowcroft/Dick More, “Subject: Statement upon release of first POWs,” February 9 1973, RNL, VPOWMIA; President’s Daily Diary, February 12, 1973, RNL; AP, February 19, 1973; “Homecoming Stage Set,” WP, February 11, 1973, p. A1; President’s News Summaries, February 12 and 13, RNL; Craig Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs: Witnesses to their Flight (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), pp. 112, 174; Time, February 19, 1973 and February 26, 1973; and Newsweek, Feburary 19, 1973 and February 26, 1973.

3 “We are honored” NBC News, February 12, 1973, VNA; Presidential Action Memo P-2309, March 10. 1973 RNL

3 “Beautiful!” sighed AP, March 5, 1973. “I must say” NBC News, February 14, 1973, VNA.

3 Especially prepared for “Greeting Here Warms Ex-POW,” CT, February 16, 1973, p. 1.

4 The first thing “Life of a POW,” LAT, February 16, 1973, p. 1.

4 By all rights “One Woman, 33 Other POWs Fly to Freedom,’ CT, March 6, 1973, p. 4.

4 When Captain John Nasmyth “Group That Sells Bracelets Wants Missing Traced,” NYT, February 26, 1973, p. 5.

4 Those braceletsMichael Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home: Ibid.; Michael Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home: POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam War (Charlotte: University of North Carolina Press, 2009), p. 57-59; H. Bruce Franklin, MIA; or Mythmaking in America (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1993), p. 57; andChristian G. Appy, Patriots: The Vietnam War Remember from All Sides (New York: Penguin Books, 2004), pp. 489-492.

4 “HANOI FREE JOHN NASMYTH” AP, March 6. 1973. “We have the greatest” “Black POW Is an Echo of 1966,” NYT, April 3, 1973, p. A1.

5 “In a deeper sense” Presidential Action Memo P-2309, March 10. 1973 RNL. “I want you to remember” Peter N. Carroll, It Seemed Like Nothing Happened; America in the 1970s (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1990), p. 97.

5 NBC broadcast from NBC News, February 18, 1973, VNA.

5 Columnist Pete HamillNew York Post, February 14, 1973; Steven V. Roberts, “New Analysis: The POWs: Focus of Division,” March 3, 1973, p. 16.

5 “Few military people” Steven V. Roberts, “20 Former P.O.W.’s Land At Air Base in California,’ NYT, February 1, 1973, p. 1.

5 When the first Marine “Edison Miller: From Marine Pilot to Censured POW to Supervisor,” LAT, August 6, 1979, p. C1.

5 At a meeting “Informal Exchange With Reporters About a Meeting With the Executive Council of the AFL-CIO,” February 19, 1973, UCSB. The next day “Remarks to a Joint Session of the South Carolina General Assembly,” February 20, 1973, UCSB.

6 “The nation begins” Davis, The Long Road Home, p. 527. Time speculated how “P.O.W.s: A Celebration of Men Redeemed,” Time, February 19, 1973. It would take Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, p. 74. A Time reader: “Letters,” Time, March 12, 1973.

6 “a decade now” NBC News, February 13, 1973.

6 On February 22Today, February 22, 1973, VNA.

7 “Having missed much” WP, March 3, 1973, p. A15.

8 On the CBS CBS News, March 22, 1973, VNA.

8 “It was like the”Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, p. 75.

8 On their front “Wives Waiting for P.O.W.’s With Hope and Anxiety,” NYT, February 5, 1973, p. 1.

9 “Are not these women” AP, March 19, 1973. “the warped sense” Tom Wicker, “Red Carpets And Other Hypocrisies,” NYT, February 15, 1973. Meanwhile the Times “Muzzled P.O.W.’s,” NYT, February 24, 1973, p. 28.

9 When American pilots Franklin, MIA, p. 40. The enemy, though Davis, The Long Road Home, p. 77; Mary Herbergerer, Traveling to Vietnam: The American Peace Activists and the War (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1998).

10 Meanwhile, Sybil Stockdale Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, pp. 24-27.

10 One day in Davis, The Long Road Home, pp. 201-202;Franklin, MIA, pp. 49-50; “Laird Appeals to Enemy to Release U.S. Captives,’ NYT, May 20, 1969, p. 1.

11 They answered Secretary Davis, The Long Road Home, p. 204.

11 “It is hard to see” “Hanoi and the American Prisoners,” WP, May 23, 1973, p. A26. The Pentagon and State Franklin, MIA, p. 51;Sybil Stockdale and James Stockdale, In Love and War: The Story of a Family’s Ordeal and Sacrifice During the Vietnam Years (Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990), pp. 309-310; Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, p. 30; Seymour Hersh, “POW Propaganda War Was Numbers Game,” Dayton News, January 17, 1971. This was part of a series published by Hersh in 1971 on how the military and State Department manipulated the POWs for propaganda purposes. “a right to know”Natasha Zaretsky, No Direction Home; The American Famiyl and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980 (Charlotte: University of North Carolina Press, 2007), p. 33.

11 On Labor Day Davis, The Long Road Home, pp. 208, 495; Seymour Hersh, Dayton News, February 15, 1971; Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, p. 34-35.

12 The timing was Mary Hersberger, Jane Fonda’s War: A Political Biography of an Antiwar Icon (New York: New Press, 2005), p. 144. See also“The Tiger Cages,” Life, July 17, 1970, and Don Luce, “We’ve Been Here Before: The Tiger Cages of Vietnam,” History News Network. Also author interview with Don Luce.

12 At the peace talks Andreas Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown: Watergate, Warhol, and the Birth of Post-Sixties America (New York: Bloomsbury USA, 2007), pp. 95-101.

12 At Christmastime, precisely “Remarks Following a Meeting With Wives and Mothers of Prisoners of War and Servicemen Missing in Action in Vietnam,” December 12, 1969, UCSB; Allen, The Long Road Home, p. 35. On Christmas Eve Franklin, MIA, p. 50; Davis, The Long Road Home, p. 223-224 (source of “Tell him his father is a murderer” quote).

12 Spring 1970, whichFranklin, MIA, p. 51-52; Davis, The Long Road Home, p. 225;Allen, Until the last Man Comes Home, p. 38. The first POW bracelets: Ibid., p. 57.

13 “as though the North Vietnamese” Jonathan Schell, The Time of Illusion (New York: Knopf, 1975), p. 231.

13 Matchbooks, lapel pins Franklin, MIA, p. 49, quotes the figure of fifty million bumper stickers since 1969. full-page adsAllen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, p. 34; see, for example, Eugene Register-Guard, November 16, 1969. “They throw food”: Herbergerer, Traveling to Vietnam, p. 165.She was confused: “The Tiger Cages,” Life, July 17, 1970.

13 a “lunatic semiology”Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown, p. 103, quoting the wise historian Richard Slotkin. “we may keep” Tom Wicker, “Illogic in Vietnam,” NYT, May 25, 1971, p. 39.

13 a rump groupAllen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, pp. 50-53;“P.O.W.’s: Speaking Out,” Time, October 11, 1971; “War Prisoners Are Now Pawns,” CT, June 13, 1971, p. A5; UPI, “Prisoners’ Families in Rift,” December 9, 1971; “3 Relatives of Prisoners of War Blast Nixon’s Ceasefire Proposal,” WP, June 2, 1972, p. A3; and coverage of controversy over proposed advertisement by “Families for Immediate Release”: “Tactics Disputed in Fight to Win Release of P.O.W.’s,” NYT, June 7, 1971, p. 3, “P.O.W. Ads Facing Controversy,” August 13, 1971, p. 44, “Campaign for War Prisoners Hits a Snag,” NYT, October 8, 1971, p. 50, and especially the New York Times Magazine article by Joseph Lelyveld, “‘Dear President Nixon, The las 24 Hours has again been another day of pure hell for Americans in prison camps, cells, and cages in Southeast Asia’: The P.O.W. families,” NYTM, October 3, 1971, p. SM14. For seconding McGovern nomination see AP, July 13, 1972. Families for Immediate Release activist Delia Alvarez, sister of the longest-held POW, Everett Alvarez, Jr., appeared on the Merv Griffin Show with Jane Fonda on April 15, 1971.

14 Seventy-eight days later “Address to the Nation Announcing the Conclusion of an Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam,” January 23, 1973, UCSB. The evening news See NBC News, February 21, 1973, and February 23, 1973, on fighting Cambodia; March 14, 1973, Kissinger to Nixon, “Response to Continued North Vietnamese Infiltration and Logistics Activity in the South,” RNL; “A Vietnam Youth Hears War Is Over, But His Way of Life Tells Him It Isn’t,” NYT, March 6, 1973; William Shawcross, Sideshow: Kissinger, Nixon, and the Destruction of Cambodia (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979), pp. 272-277.

14 Four hundred photographers Davis, The Long Road Home, pp. 330-340, 496-497. See also report ssdated April 6, 1972, “ANNEX F—INFORMATION/PUBLIC AFFAIRS” AND “ANNEX L—SECURITY” (“Large numbers of news media personnel and curiosity seekers will desire to be present at every location and state of repatriation and processing. Procedures must be established to protect returnees from public curiosity and display during a period of extreme personal, emotional turmoil and confusion, and to expedite processing”) and June 1, 1972, inRNLPOW. “they were healthy” Davis, The Long Road Home, p. 515. The Los Angeles Times Bernard Sklar, “POWs: Quick Will Return Too Slowly From the Dead,” LAT, February 4, 1973, p. K3. “They did not say” “Civilian P.O.W.’s Get Help if They Are Silent,” NYT, January 31, 1973, p. 17.

14 On February 21 “Managing the P.O.W.’s: Military Public Relations Men Filter Prisoner Story in a Careful Program,” NYT, February 21, 1973, p. 4. The Washington Post’s ombudsman “Return of the Prisoners: Script by the Military,” WP, February 23, 1973, p. A18.

15 And in March 1973 “Letters to the Editor: Return of the POWs—Was Their Reaction Spontaneous or Programmed,” WP, March 3, 1973, p. A15.

16 A New York Times “Thoughts on Reentering ‘The World’”: Prisoners,” NYT, February 18, 1973, p. 246. A February 23 “P.O.W.’s Maintained Discipline but Had Some Quarrels,” NYT, February 23, 1973, p. 1. Aggressive network correspondents ABC News, CBS News, February 23, 1973.

17 “Voices in Vital America”: “Unit for P.O.W.’s Has New Project: Group That Sells Bracelets Wants Missing Traced,” NYT, February 26, 1973, p. 5. NBC ran an exposé: NBC News, February 28, 1973. Time’s correspondent described “Vietnam: The Other Prisoners,” Time, March 19, 1973.

17 On Wednesday, February 28 “Assembly Hails Vietnam G.I.’s, But the Wording Causes Debate,” NYT, March 1, 1973, p. 55.

17 That Thursday, newspapers UPI, March 1, 1973. See also presidential news summary, March 3, 1973, RNL. On Friday the Nixon “The President’s News Conference,” March 2, 1973, UCSB.

18 On Sunday the next AP, March 4, 1973.“We wanted to come” UPI, March 5, 1973. “Free Navy POW Sure” WP, March 5, 1973, p. A3.

18 “These people had” “P.O.W.’s Planned Business Venture,” NYT, March 6, 1973, p. 12. “The POWs: Focus” Steven V. Roberts, “New Analysis: The POWs: Focus of Division,” March 3, 1973, p. 16.

18 Sticks and BonesAuthor correspondence with David Rabe; “‘Sticks and Bones’ on C.B.S. March 9,” NYT, February 21, 1973; “Papp’s ‘Sticks and Bones’ Put Off by C.B.S.,” NYT, March 7, 1973, p. 87; John J. O’Connor, “TV: ‘Sticks and Bones’: It Won’t Be Seen, but It Should Be, Even Though Production Isn’t Very Good,” NYT, March 9, 1973; “A.C.L.U. Decries C.B.S. Over Play,” NYT, March 9, 1773; “John of F.C.C. Hits Nixon Policy: Compares Attitude on Media to That of Nazi Germany,” NYT, March 10, 1973; Russell Baker, “U.S.-Approved Happiness,” NYT, March 11, 1973, p. 219; Nicholas von Hoffman, “Television Is In Safe Hands,” CT, March 13, 1973, p. 18; John J. O’Connor, “How About Some Backbone: The medium can be more than a lulling narcotic,” NYT, March 18, 1973; “Paley, C.B.S. Chairman, Personally Vetoed Showing of ’Sticks and Bones,’” NYT, March 20, 1973, p. 78. See also ad with review excerpts, NYT, March 12, 1973, p. 63. DVD of cancelled broadcast viewed by author, courtesy of David Rabe.

19 On March 28 Alistair Cooke, Reporting America (New York: Overlook, 2008), p. 204. That same day Robert J. Lifton, “Heroes and Victims,” NYT, March 28, 1973, p. 47. “We will run” “Paley, C.B.S. Chairman, Personally Vetoed Showing of ’Sticks and Bones,’” NYT, March 20, 1973, p. 78.

000 “people think and feel” Steven V. Roberts, “Skepticism Pervades a California Suburb After Decade of Conflict in Vietnam,” NYT, February 4, 1973, p. 50. 000 shedding its Linus blankets”: See presidential news summary , March 21, 1973, RNL. They included officials NYT, April 1, 1973, Week in Review. and the American Psychological: AP, April 19, 1973.

20 On TV he grilled See presidential news summary, March 16, 1973, RNL.

21 Robert F. Kennedy had Arthur Schlesinger, Robert Kennedy and His Times (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1978), p. 449.

21 The last Freedom Bird “6,500 Cheer as Last Planeload of POWs Lands,” LAT, April 2, 1973, p. A1. Howe, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 159-160; Davis, The Long Road Home, pp. 496-503,521.

21 And on the first “A Night to ‘Let it Loose’ for ex-POWs,” LAT, April 2, 1973, p. H1.

22 “It Won’t Be Enough” “POWs Exempted from State Tax,” LAT, April 19, 1973.

22 The Reagan flew “Eager to Explode ‘Political Myths’: Reagan—He’ Back on the ‘Sawdust Trail,” LAT, April 3, 1973, p. C1; “Gov. Reagan Urges Support of President,” Atlanta Daily World, April 3, 1973, p. 3; “Chotiner Says Nixon Aides Should Have Come Forward,” WP, April 1, 1973, p. A11; “Reagan May Covet Presidency; Speaks Southern Language in Atlanta,” Rome News Tribune, April 2, 1973.

23 One of the Watergate John J. Sirica, To Set the Record Straight: The Break-in, The Tapes, The Conspirators, The Pardon (New York: W.W. Norton, 1979), pp. 107-108. Barry Goldwater said AP, April 12, 1973.

23 Only Reagan was “Chotiner Says Nixon Aides Should Have Come Forward,” WP, April 1, 1973, p. A11. the president’s “lynching” Reagan to Rev. B.H. Cleaver, May 24, 1973, in Kiron K. Skinner, Annalise Anderson, and Martin Anderson, eds., Reagan: A Life in Letters (New York: Free Press, 2004, p. 94. At his weekly: Daily Review, March 28, 1973.

 

 

CHAPTER TWO: STORIES

 

24 A snowstorm had Reagan to Rev. Leonard Kirk, March 23, 1983, in Kiron K. Skinner, Annalise Anderson, and Martin Anderson, eds., Reagan: A Life in Letters (New York: Free Press, 2004, p. 13; Ronald Reagan, An American Life: The Autobiography (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1990), p. 21. The blustering Irish: Ibid. “I think he’s perfectly”Ronald Reagan with Richard Hubler, Where’s the Rest of Me? (New York: Duell, Sloan & Pierce, 1965), p. 7.

24 “But who knows” Ronald Reagan, An American Life: The Autobiography (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1990), p. 21. The addition about becoming president was not in his first memoir, but was introduced in the second. In another, Ronald Michael Reagan, Michael Reagan: On the Outside Looking In (New York, Zebra, 1988), p. 16; Norman E. Wymbs, A Place To Go Back To: Ronald Reagan in Dixon, Illinois (Vantage Press, 1987), p. 45; and see Reagan’s biography on the web site of his alma mater, Eureka College. In An American Life, Reagan says his brother got his nickname from his football buddies. And then there Amazon reviewer of A Place To Go Back To: “My mother was born in 1915, and I have two older aunts that attended school with Ronald, oh I forgot, the official boyhood name is now “Dutch.” They don’t seem to remember any of this either.” Which may, or Reagan, An American Life, p. 21.

25 a hot summer Reagan, An American Life, p. 23. However, as president Author interview, Chris Robling.

25 In his first Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 15; see also Skinner et al., Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 4. “Jack clobbered us”: Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 16.

25 The family soon Ibid., p. 18. Over-the-river-and-through-the-woods Ibid., p. 23. A magical vacant Ibid., p. 16. Chaotic neighborhood football Ibid., p. 21. A story that Reagan, An American Life, p. 25; Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 17. “an uneasy feeling” Ibid., p. 18.

25 “The house grew” Anne Edwards, Early Reagan (New York: Morrow, 1987, p. 39. Edwards cites a Modern Screen interview with Reagan from 1944. Glorious parades where Reagan, An American Life, p. 26. One boy brought Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 40. Edwards cites an undated article by Ida Zeitlin; probably inModern Screen (March 1943), p. 31.

25 He began scampering Reagan, An American Life, p. 24; Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 16. “Aunt Emma and Uncle Jim” Ibid., p. 20; Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 43.

26 Ice-skating on the Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 24. “a scrawny, undersized” Ibid., p. 15.

26 “Filling one of those”Reagan, An American Life, p. 34.

27 “We tell ourselves stories” Joan Didion, The White Album (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979), p. 11. “Between the ages” Garry Wills, Reagan’s America: Innocents At Home (New York: Doubleday, 1986), p. 18. “At any given spot” Paul Kengor, God and Ronald Reagan: A Spiritual Life (New York: HarperCollins, 2004), p. 7.

28 “endowed with a gift” Reagan, An American Life, p. 21. “Details of the incident” Ron Reagan, My Father at 100 (New York: Plume, 2012), p. 71.”psychosis has supplanted” AP, December 3, 1924.

28 “Jesus walked barefoot” Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 57. and claimed expertiseLou Cannon, Governor Reagan: His Rise to Power (New York: Public Affairs, 2004), p. 11. See 1918 newspaper ad for American School of Proctipedics here. “I strive some needy”Reagan, My Father at 100, p. 51. “Many of us”: Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 105.

29 Nelle began taking Edwards, Early Reagan, 60. One hagiographic biography Mary Beth Brown, Hand of Providence: The Strong and Quiet Faith of Ronald Reagan (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2005), p. 19. A more skeptical: Jonas McCord quoted in “Ronald Reagan Movie Planed for 2011,” Reuters, September 8. 2010.

29 In 1922, at Dixon Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 27. “a delightful portrayal” Kengor, God and Ronald Reagan, p. 11. “Ship of Faith”: Ibid. “splendid talk”: Ibid., p. 12. “Fellows Home Scene” Dixon Telegraph, April 9, 1927, p. 24.”Mrs. J.E. Reagan”: Dixon Telegraph, September 9, 1927.

30 “Dispomaniac and Kleptomaniac”Lodi Sentinel, July 23, 1914. “Man Who Violated” Lodi Sentinel, August 15, 1914. “Son Appears Before”Lodi Sentinel, April 13, 1912. Perhaps it helpedReagan, An American Life, p. 30. one of the distinguishing Thanks to William Staudenmeier of Eureka College, a scholarly expert on the history and sociology of alcoholism, for discussion of social conventions of local Prohibition enforcement.

30 “We didn’t have a cat” Neil Reagan interview, Regional Oral History Office, Bancroft Library, University of California–Berkeley. “Our main meal” Reagan, An American Life, pp. 28-29.

30 As an adult Sidney Skolsky, “Hollywood Is My Beat” column, Citizen News, February 26, 1948, AEP, Box 60, Folder 13. In his speechesThomas Byrne Edsall and Mary Edsall, Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics (New York: Norton, 1992), p. 148. In a 1985Skinner et al, Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 10; Jack Shelley questionnaire, AEP, Box 60 folder 7. “I have 12”: Skinner et al., Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 3.

31 There is a picture Wymbs, A Place To Go Back To, p. 46. The picture, alas, is not available for publication. that he was Lou Cannon, Reagan (New York: Perigee Books, 1984), p. 27; Wymbs, A Place to Go Back To, p. 63; Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 37; Cannon, op. cit. The figure described See the work of Sharon Wegscheider-Cruse. See The Family Trap: No One Escapes from a Chemically Dependent Family (Minneapolis: Johnson Institute, 1976).

32 There is another Wymbs, A Place To Go Back To.

32 There s a picture Ibid.

32 “The whole world” Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 52.

33 “So unmistakable that”Edmund Morris, Dutch: A Memoir of Ronald Reagan (New York: Random House, 1999), p. 59.

33 “What are you” Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 62.

33 Card No. 3695Dixon Telegraph, April 26, 1984, AEP, Box 61, folder 13.

33 “upon an unknown”Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes (Chicago: A.C. McClurg & Co., 1914, p. 22. (This is a facsimile of the original illustrated edition Reagan likely read.)

34 He read every Reagan to Miss Helen P. Miller, September 3, 1981, Skinner et all, Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 7; Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 53. “As for Frank” Horatio Alger, Silas Snobden’s Office Boy (New York: J.S. Ogilvie, 1904). As of 1911, the year of Reagan’s birth, Standish had published one hundred and sixty-two Merriwell books.

34 “I would make” Reagan to Miller, op. cit. Miller, the librarian at the Dixon Public, sent President Reagan a letter asking him for recollections of his reading.

35 “We also know” Reagan to Miller: “I also read Brown of Harvard but didn’t like the hero as well as Merriwell, and for years that made me a little biased against Harvard”;Rida Johnson Young and Gilbert P. Coleman, Brown of Harvard (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Son, 1907). For his opinions on Yale and Harvard, see, first, LWL, January 20. 1977: “Thanks for the kind cookies offer but Ron is home now. No, he didn’t get bounced—did fine, as a matter of fact—but he’s taking a leave of absence for a while—which is alright with me. I wasn’t all that happy about Yale. It was better when Frank Merriwell was there.” See also Reagan to William F. Buckley, June 16, 1972, in Skinner et al., Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 281, on the occasion of Buckley, a Yalie, receiving an honorary degree from Harvard: “Frank Merriwell must have turned over on the library shelf.” See, finally, his quotation from a December 18, 1946 Associated Press article excoriating a Harvard sociologist for arguing “one of the first things that has to be done to control the family system is to clean out the group of disintegrated people in Hollywood”, with its “synthetic, childless population.” Reagan responded, “”‘Never having been on the Harvard campus, I feel no more qualified to discuss the professor than he is to discuss Hollywood and the motion picture people. If the professor could be persuaded to leave the cloistered halls where intellectual inbreeding substitutes for the ‘synthetic’ life of Hollywood, I believe we could show him that the people in the studios, gathered from the cities, towns, and farms, are a pretty good cross section of American life, no better, no worse. “As to fertility, I believe that movie families could match that of the Harvard professor, both as to the numbers and quality.”

35 In 1972, a Long Island“Frank Merriwell Is Back!”, Life, February 11, 1972, p. 51.

36 He talked nonstop Cannon, Ronald Reagan, p. 25.

36 “a sense of optimism” Reagan, An American Life, pp. 20-21.

36 Shortly before he Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 34; Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 22-32; author interview with Martin E. Marty. Its rituals became Neil Reagan oral history, op. cit.

36 Out of curiosity: Reagan to Miller, op. cit.; Reagan to Mrs. Jean B. Wright, March 13, 1984, Skinner et al, Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 6. Harold Bell Wright, That Printer of Udell’s: A Story of the Middle West (New York: A.L. Burt Company, 1902).

37 A neighbor described Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 28. The family never Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 24; Neil Reagan oral history. She had changed Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 28. In 1924 he acted Kengor, God and Ronald Reagan, p. 29. “mellow, distinctive voice” Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 105.

38 “Without moving the pick” Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 27.

38 In another, Jack Ibid., p. 13.

38 “My father bought” Ibid., p. 20.

38 Her mother’s beloved Edwards, Early Reagan, pp. 68,143. He assures us Ibid., p. 67; Neil Reagan oral history.

39 “came home to find” Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 12.

40 “Mr. Reagan, who” Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 17.

41 “the greatest collection”Mark Inabinett, Grantland Rice and His Heroes: The Sportswriter as Mythmaker in the 1920s (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1994), p. 17. In the 1920s: Ibid., p 87. the “House That Ruth” Ibid., p. 44.

40 “as incredible as” Ibid., p. 40. “…which of them” Ibid., p. 75.

40 Boxing had been Ibid., p. 26. “dating back to days” New York Tribune, July 5, 1919. The Dixon Telegraph September 24, 1926, viewed at Dixon Public Library.

41 The actual Babe RuthInabinett, Grandland Rice and His Heroes, p. 47. “The true democracy” Ibid., p. 17. “that help build” Ibid., p. 3.

41 Scolds at the Ibid., p. 19. “They raise false” Ibid., p. 22. “Heroes can thrive” Ibid., p. 24.

41 Radio Digest claimed Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 140. The volume of sportsInabinett, Grantland Rice and His Heroes, p. 18.

42 His first surviving Skinner et al, Ronald Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 3.

42 “Ponzi Leaves Jail”Dixon Telegraph, August 13, 1924. “Girl Branded Youth” Dixon Telegraph, August 13, 1924. “Gen. Dawes Condemned”Dixon Telegraph, August 20. 1924. “Fiendish Slayer Is Heading”Dixon Telegraph, October 7, 1925.

43 “There’s a game”Reagan, My Father At 100, p. 141.

43 eighteen dollars a week Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 37. fifteen in other tellings Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 27.

43 how he selflessly Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 36-37; Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 14, 63; Reagan, An American Life, p. 40; Wymbs, A Place To Go Back To, p. 75; Ron Reagan, “My Father’s Memories,” Esquire, June, 2003. See, too, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 18, on the canal where he and friends swam in Galesburg: “It was dangerous to those who could not handle themselves in water; several times I recall the hushed mood of the town when they brought a small covered burden home from the canal.” “the notches multiplied” Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 98. “I guess you were” Ibid., p. 64. In 1986 Paul Kengor, The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism (New York: Harper Perennial, 2007), p. 7.

43 F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Great Gatsby (New York: Scribner, 1925), chapter 1. (“If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away.”)

43 “Before long,” Reagan Reagan, An American Life, p. 41. He had a way Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 94.

44 Frazer saw in Dutch Lee Edwards, Ronald Reagan: A Political Biography (San Diego: Viewpoint Books, 1967), p. 15. “He wanted to live”: Wymbs, A Place To Go Back To, p. 72.

44 “You know why” Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 64. He brought his windup Ibid., p. 65. Oh, that’s just” Ibid., p. 66.

44 He later expressed Ron Reagan, “My Father’s Memories.”

44 “Meditations of a Lifeguard” Reprinted from 1928 Dixonian here.

45 “[o]ne of the members” Wills, Reagan’s America, p. 37. The accounts, however Ibid., p. 40. His senior yearbook 1928 Dixonian, viewed at Dixon Public Library.

45 “Condition, courage, stamina” Inabinett, Grantland Rice and His Heroes, p. 88. “a kind of clean”Lou Cannon, President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime (New York: Public Affairs, 2000), p. 180. “watching and hearing” Reagan, An American Life, p. 34.

46 “It was midseason” Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 24.

46 Reagan’s youngest son Reagan, My Father at 100, p. 142.

46 “To every man comes” Reprinted from 1928 Dixonian here.

47 “I wonder what” Ibid. the Dixonian includes Reagan’s contribution to the yearbook are transcribed in this auction offering, including his inscription to a class mate.

48 “There’s a wall” Nancy Reagan, My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan (New York: Random House, 1989).

49 “Looking back my”Reagan to Mr. Kip Hayden, 1974, in Skinner et al, Ronald Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 20. “I shall always” Reagan to Mrs. Jean B. Wright, March 13, 1984, Ibid., p. 6. “fresh in my memory” Reagan to Richard Crane, November 19. 1981, Ibid., p. 101.

 

 

CHAPTER THREE: LET THEM EAT BRAINS

 

50 At his inaugurationRick Perlstein, Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America (New York: Scribner, 2008), p. 360. A little more than: Ibid., p. 435. In August 1971: Ibid., p. 603.

51 “I’m not going” Ibid., p. 680. The Chicago Tribune See “Nixon Must Explain ‘Scandals,’ 2 Aides to McGovern Say,” CT, August 28, 1972, p. 1; note quotation marks. A Watergate inquiry: Stanley Kutler, The Wars of Watergate: The Last Crisis of Richard Nixon (New York: Knopf, 1990), pp. 225-234. Before the 1972 Nick Thimmesch column, October 12, 1972. “Now,” he wrote: Richard Nixon, RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon (New York: Gorsset & Dunlap, 1978), p. 276.

51 The gross national product: Allen J. Matusow, Nixon’s Economy: Booms, Busts, Dollars, and Votes (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998), p. 220. a twenty-three-year-old wrote: WP, “Nothing Sacred?” June 27, 1973, p. A31. In New York a group Kevin Phillips column, May 1, 1973.

51 Chief of Staff H. R. “Bob” Haldeman See Irving Kristol, “The Nightmare of Watergate,” WSJ, May 17, 1973, p. 20. Nixon announced a radical Matusow, Nixon’s Economy, p. 215. He announced a See Jefferson Cowie, Stayin’ Alive; The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class (New York: New Press, 2010), Chapter Three, “Nixon’s Class Struggle,” pp. 125-167. “I’m awful bullish” Ibid., p. 166.

52 The indictment was John J. Sirica, To Set the Record Straight: The Break-in, The Tapes, The Conspirators, The Pardon (New York: W.W. Norton, 1979), p. 57. “Did they get” Ibid., p. 45.

What was the purpose” Ibid., p. 54.

On January 29, 1973: Ibid., p. 61. At a cocktail James C. Goulden, The Benchwarmers: The Private World of the Powerful Federal Judges (New York: Balentine Books, 1974), p.188. “I am still not” Ibid., p. 65. The New York Times dismissed “Still No Real Answers: Watergate,” NYT, February 4, 1973, p. 213. “simply inconceivableKutler, Wars of Watergate, p. 256.

53 Newsweek called itMatusow, Nixon’s Economy, p. 217. He also announced “White House Sets Impounded Funds Below Estimate,” NYT, February 6, 1973, p. 1. So Senator Ervin Matusow, Nixon’s Economy, p. 217. Congressman Wright Patman Ibid. Fulbright’s hometown Presidential News Summary, March 16, 1973, RNL.

53 “soft-headed judges” “Radio Address About the State of the Union Message on Law Enforcement and Drug Abuse Prevention,” March 10, 1973, UCSB. Exilarated liberals Matusow 217.

53 Saturday, March 17 “Country Superstar Rouses White House; Ex-Convict Invited By Nixon to Stand in Reception Line,” NYT, March 19, 1973, p. 40;Cowie, Stayin’ Alive, pp. 168-173; H.R. Haldeman, The Haldeman Diaries: Inside the Nixon White House (New York: Putnam, 1994), p. 718.

54 “Do you know whether” “Action Express” column, CT, March 23, 1973, p. A1.

54 The Committee to Re-Elect “What Was the Money For?”, NYT Week in Review, March 18, 1973, p. 203. A political cartoonis: LAT, March 20, 1973, p. D6. Reprinted here.

55 The judge began reading: Sirica, To Set the Record Straight, p. 107-108.

55 “What all this means” Joseph Kraft, “The Watergate and the White House,” WP, March 27, 1973, p. A19.

55 The judge then explained Sirica, To Set the Record Straight, pp. 85-86.

56 “Hugh, I have nothing” Jack Anderson column, March 28, 1973. “disturbed by the White House” “‘I Have Nothing To Hide,’ Nixon Says On Scandal,” Pittsburgh Press, March 24, 1973.

56 Kraft wrote that Kraft, “Watergate and the White House.” Woodward and Bernstein got “McCord Arrest Sparked Mrs. Mitchell’s Outburst,” WP, March 24, 1973, p. A1.

56 Pat Gray admitted “F.B.I. Chief: ‘Tattletale Gray,’” NYT Week in Review, March 25, 1973, p. 220. International Telephone & Telegraph Corporation Presidential News Summary, March 12, 1973, RNL; “McCone Defends I.T.T. Chile Fund Idea,” NYT, March 22, 1973, p. 1. Robert Vesco was reported: What Was the Money For?”, NYT Week in Review, March 18, 1973, p. 203. The Sunday New York Times’ “A Job for a ‘Clown,’” NYT, March 25, 1973, p. 220. Time gingerly wondered “American Notes: A Disturbing Pattern,” Time, April 2, 1973. Senator James Buckley Ibid. “somebody still in”: Ibid.

57 Perhaps Connecticut, where: “Cartoon for Steak on Layaway Plan Stirred Connecticut Housewife to Call Meat Boycott: Vitamin Pills Offered,’ NYT, March 30, 1973, p. 24. Perhaps in Southern California’s “Housewives Rebel: Two L.A. Women Provide Impetus for Meat Boycott,” LAT, March 14, 1973, p. A1.

57 President Nixon’s consumer NBC, March 16, 1973, VNA.

58 The president repeated “The President’s News Conference,” March 15, 1973, UCSB. the mail in response “The Roast Beef Rebellion,” NYT Week in Review, March 25, 1973, p. 219. At the Merle Haggard “Country Superstar Rouses White House; Ex-Convict Invited By Nixon to Stand in Reception Line,” NYT, March 19, 1973, p. 40. “It makes me literally” “Housewives Organize Meat Boycott,” WP, March 15, 1973, p. A3.

58 Housewives in Manhattan NBC, March 16, 1973, VNA. In Chicago activists “Women Have Beef with U.S.,” CT, March 22, 1973, p. 2. San Francisco demonstrators “$17 Baloney Token Sent to Reagan,’ LAT, April 3, 1973, p. 23.

58 Ronald Reagan at his “Day in Sacramento: A Summary of Major Action March 27, 1973,” LAT, March 28, 1973, p. D2.

58 In 1971, a student-operated “Tax Queries Invade Privacy—Reagan,” LAT, May 6, 1971, p. 1; “Younger Asks to Investigate News ‘Leak’ on Reagan Taxes,” LAT, May 8, 1971, p. A1; “Source of Reagan Tax Tip Ruled Confidential,” LAT, June 19, 1973, p. A3; “Reagan Gets Lecture on ‘Tax Dodge,’” WP, July 17, 1973; Shana Alexander column, Newsweek, April 15, 1973; “Ford Lists $115,000 Tax Bite on $250,000 Income,” Scripps-Howard, February 13, 1976; “Aide Says Reagan Paid Federal Taxes in 1970,” UPI, May 18, 1976.

59 One month later: “Reagan a ‘Gentleman Rancher,’ Keeps Cattle for Tax Loohpole,” UPI, June 14, 1973. The New York Times discovered “Reagan May Have Found a Tax Shelter in Cattle Breeding Herds,” NYT, June 13, 1971, p. 71.

59 only ABC paid ABC News, May 5, 1971, VNA. Georgia governor Jimmy Carter “Governor Discloses Tax Report,” AP, May 14, 1971.

59 “Governor, a few” “Day in Sacramento: A Summary of Major Action March 27, 1973,” LAT, March 28, 1973, p. D2. “It’s just like” Steven F. Roberts, “Ronald Reagan Is Giving ‘Em Heck,” NYTM, October 25, 1970, p. SM 22.

60 The day before “Meat Boycott,” WP, March 23, 1973, p. A8. Representative William Cotter “Congressmen Get Complaints On Mails and Add Their Own,” NYT, March 24, 1973, p. 16. A Cleveland judge “Beef Is Precious Is Judge’s Ruling,” AP, April 2, 1973.

60 “They like zucchini: “Hail to the Chef: Less Beef for Nixons,” LAT, March 26, 1973, p. F1. A chain with thirteen: “Meat Prices Drop In Face of Revolt,” WP, March 28, 1973, p. A1. Three days later: “Food Chain Joins Boycott, Won’t Sell Meat Monday,” WSJ, March 30 1973, p. 20. A Dubuque, Iowa, packing: “Meat Boycott Forces Dubuque Packing Co. To Curtail Operations,” WSJ, March 28, 1973, p. 32.

60 The president tried “Address to the Nation About Vietnam and Domestic Problems,” March 29, 1973, UCSB.

61 The Chicago Tribune found “Meatless Sunday for Boycotters,” CT, April 2, 1973, p. 20. Sales were down 80: “Meat Sales Drop 80% In Places As Boycott Begins,” NYT, April 3, 1973, p. 1. Another new movement: NBC News, March 18, 1973, VNA. A frustrated, defiant CBS News, April 2, 1973.

61 Time put “Food ”Time, April 9, 1973. “I’ve never protested” “Boycott Leaders Still Beef,” CT, March 30, 1973, p. 16. Rumor had it “OEP Says Gas Rationing Unlikely,” WP, March 10, 1973, p. A6. In Atlanta, a Presidential News Summary, March 15, 1973, under “ECONOMY,” RNL. The price of onions AP, April 13, 1973.

61 On New Year’sNewsweek, January 22, 1973; WP, January 13, 1973.

62 At the end of January “Robbers Give Up Vow to Die for ‘Victory and Paradise,’” NYT, January 22, 1973, p. 1. Black September, the terrorists Presidential News Summary, March 3, 1973, RNL.

62 Two days later “Parents vs. Religious Communes: Parents Fighting Religious Communes by Retaking Their Children,” NYT, March 5, 1973, p. 1.

62 March was also “Corruption; Busting Public Servants,” Time, April 23, 1973.

 

 

CHAPTER FOUR: EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

 

64 Official Washington had “FBI’s Gray: At Least a Whiff of Politics,” NYT Week in Review, March 4, 1973, p. 194.

64 In his Judiciary Committee Ibid.; “Watergate et al.: Shadows on the White House,” NYT Week in Review, March 11, 1973, p. 207.

64 The name of: Ibid.; “Watergate: Who Called the Signals?”, NYT Week in Review, March 18, 1973, p. 203.

64 “a little-understood and” “Presidential Issues: Executive Privilege,” NYT Week in Review, March 18, 1973., p. 203; see also presidential news summary, March 16, 1973, RNL.

64 “Divine right went out: UPI, April 3, 1973. “That is not executive” AP, April 2, 1973.

64 WOR radio in Listen here. Time called itTime, April 16, 1973.

65 In Washington, Captain AP, March 31, 1973. “I do not regret” Norfolk New Journaland Guide, April 14, 1973.

65 The front pages See for instance here and here and here. The UPI ran UPI, April 12, 1973. He said, “I admire” USNWR, May 5, 1973.

65 Their stories See “POW’s Nightmarish Ordeal,” WP, March 30, 1973, p. A1; “Former POWs Charge Torture By North Vietnam” NYT, March 30, 1971, p. 1; UPI, March 30, 1973; UPI, April 2, 1973; Denton AP interviews; and, authoritatively and comprehensively, Chapter Three, “Torture and War’s Body,” Craig Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs: Witnesses to their Flight (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), pp. 53-73.

66 “We now began” AP, April 4, 1974.

66 “Everybody says we” “POWs Felt Their Mission Was to Resist,” NYT, April 30, 1973.

66 “we walked out of Hanoi” Steven V. Roberts, “New Analysis: The POWs: Focus of Division,” March 3, 1973, p. 16.

66 Nixon spent more Presidential conversations 841-3, Janaury 24, 1973, 8:12 a.m., 843-7, January 26, 11:10 a.m., 43-10, January 31, 12:34 p.m., 43-57, February 13, 1973, 43-66, 12:55 p.m., 43-52, February 14, 1973, 12:37 p.m. , 43-5, 5:29 p.m., 43-86, 8:04 p.m., 43-109, 6:34 p.m., 43-120, 3:18 p.m., 43-143, 10:04 a.m. Also documents from RNLPOW box 2: Kehrli to Kissinger, February 3, 1973, “SUBJECT; POWs “; Kissinger to Nixon President’s Daily Briefs, February 5, 1973; Bull to Khrli on sending corsages to POW wives, February 13, 1973; correspondence with Steve Bull on Mrs. Sandy Bagley visit, February 6, 1973; Kehrli to Dave Park “re POW Visits to White House,” February 14, 1973; mom com RN to Goodpaster, February 15, 1973; David Parker to Skowcroft, Feburary 23, 1973, Richardson to RN, March 1, 1973, on job opportunities for returning POWs; all in RNLPOW; David Parker to Scowcroft, March 3, 1973; presidential meetings with Robinson Risner and Jeremiah Denton, March 12, 1973; Haldeman note, March 13, 1973, RNL, “Hope for our POW dinner”; Baroody to Haldeman, March 22, 1973 on ads for POW employment. Also “The President’s News Conference,” January 31, 1973, UCSB. See also presidential handwriting file, February/2 of 2 for February 20 1973 draft of personal note from RN to returning POWs. He fiddled with: Gergen to Scowcroft/Moore, “SUBJECT: Statement upon release of first POWs,” February 9, 1973, RNLPOW. “They could have” memcom, RN with Shields and Scowcroft, April 11, 1973, RNLPOW. “when a policeman noticed” Michigan Daily, April 13, 1973.

67 A POW named Charlie: Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, pp. 147, 161; Charlie Plumb as told to Glen DeWerff, I’m No Hero: A POW Story (Independence Press, 1992), p. 18.

67 The American Psychological Association: AP, April 19, 1973. Jane Fonda went “Actress Says POWs Lying about Torture,” Boston Globe, April 1, 1973, p. 11. “They are professional killers”:“Jane Fonda and POWs,” LAT, April 26, 1973, p. C6; Craig Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), p. 53.

67 They could point “Told to Blur POW Report, Doctor Says; Talk on Bad Health Drew Order, AF Major Claims,” LAT, May 11, 1973, p. B3. if it had been See chart, “Capital Briefing: Goals ‘Substantially Achieved,’ Kissinger Says of Efforts,” NYT, January 25, 1973, p. 1.

68 “The contrast . . . between” Letters, Time, April 16, 1973.

68 The philosopher Alistair: Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 53. “queen of torments” Ibid., pp. 56-60. I derive this entire discussion from Howes, to whom I am enormously indebted for his brilliant and comprehensive discussion and documentation of these issues.

69 “BACK US”: Ibid., pp. 31-32. That stood for “don’t Bow in public; tay off the Air [i.e., don’t allow your voice to be used in radio broadcasts]; admit no Crimes, never Kiss them goodbye, United over Self.”

69 A flier named Richard: Ibid., pp. 68-69.

69 “There’s no glory” “Edison Miller: From Marine Pilot to Censured POW to Supervisor,” LAT, August 6, 1979, p. C1. they were grunts Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 34. Prisoners now inhabited Ibid., pp. 9, 108; NBC News, March 18, 1973, VNA; Presidential news Summary, March 19, 1973, RNL; Jeremiah Denton, AP interview, April 9, 1973. When their captors Ibid.; Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 108. On Mother’s Day “Edison Miller: From Marine Pilot to Censured POW to Supervisor”; “Surviving Controversy, Former POW Starts on New Life,” LAT, December 16, 1973, p. OC1. “Peace Committee”: Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, pp. 109-111.

70 Jim Stockdale had Sybil Stockdale and James Stockdale, In Love and War: The Story of a Family’s Ordeal and Sacrifice During the Vietnam Years (Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990), pp. 33-36, 168. He drew up Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, pp. 107-108. “R.W.H.S.W.D.G.B.U!” Ibid., p. 150.

71 “We strongly appeal” “30 POWs Ask Congress o Act,” CT, January 3, 1973, p. 3. At that, a hard-liner Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 109; AP, June 29, 1973.

71 He went on 60 Minutes Seymour Hersh, “P.O.W. Who Made Antiwar Statements Recall Recalls ‘Pressure of Conscience’,” NYT, April 1, 1973, p. 3 A twenty-seven year old Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 29.

71 How, he asked Howes,Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 36.

72 “Mitchell Aide Got $70,000” WP, April 11, 1973, p. A1.

72 A scene for a fly memcom, RN with Shields and Scowcroft, April 11, 1973, RNLPOW.

73 He was referringH. Bruce Franklin, MIA; or Mythmaking in America (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1993), p. 97.

73 “we will not rest” AP, February 12, 1973. VIVA was still “Group That Sells Bracelets Wants Missing Traced,” NYT, February 26, 1973, p. 5. On March 30 “No. 589—and Out; Last POWs Return; Final Man Named Agnew But It’s a Coincidence,” NYT, March 30, 1973. The commander of the 4th Denton Interview with AP, April 12, 1973. Chicago MIA families “Don’t Abandon the Misisng, Servicemen’s Kin Urge U.S.,” CT, April 16, 1973, p. C15. “What would that prove?”Michael Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home: Ibid.; Michael Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home: POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam War (Charlotte: University of North Carolina Press, 2009), p. 98.
74
And there was another: William Shawcross, Sideshow: Kissinger, Nixon, and the Destruction of Cambodia (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979), pp. 272-277.

74 Another mess was Thomas Frank, The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Rule (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2008), pp. 155-156.

74 “The Congress has” “The Congress: Rising Emotions Over Money and Secrecy,” Time, April 23, 1973; “Presidential Secrets: Keeping Congress At Bay,” NYT Week in Review, April 15, 1973, p. 212.

75 “I don’t like the surgeon’s Ibid.

75 The Watergate grand jury “A Spate of Names–No Certainties,” NYT Week in Review, April 1, 1973, p. 234; “Pressures on Watergate, ” NYT Week in Review, April 15, 1973, p. 212. On Hunt’s wife see“Mrs. Hunt Paid Me, McCord Testifies,” Milwaukee Journal, April 10, 1973.

75 John Mitchell was spotted UPI, April 15, 1973.

76 On April 17 “Remarks Announcing Procedures and Developments in Connection With the Watergate Investigations,” April 17, 1973, UCSB; “Indictments? When?”, NYT, April 29, 1973, p. 213.

76 Young Ronald ZieglerCarl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, All the President’s Men (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1975), p. 291; “The Press: Roughing Up Ron,” Time, June 4, 1973.

76 Time magazine helpfully“The Naton: It’s Inoperative: They Misspoke Themselves,” Time, April 30, 1973.

77 On the fifth day AP, April 23, 1973. The next issue “The Administration; Ripping Open an Incredible Scandal,” Time, April 30 1973. A high official NYT Week in Review, April 29, 1973.

CHAPTER FIVE: A WHALE OF A GOOD CHEERLEADER
 
78 John Mitchell contradicted Milwaukee Journal, May 17, 1973. Deputy campaign manager Jack Anderson column, April 23, 1973. Chief of staff “Capital Lawyer Emerging As Key Watergate Figure,” NYT, April 27, 1973, p. 14. A young staffer: “G.O.P. Aide Resigns; Cite ‘Kiddie Corps,” CT, April 25, 1973, p. 3. Pat Gray resigned “Gray Seen Destroying Hunt’s Files,” WP, April 27, 1973, p. A1; “Gray Resigns; Ruckelshaus Heads FBI; Hunt, Liddy Linked to Ellsberg Case,” WP, April 28, 1973, p. A1. Reporters unearthed a new: “Big Money, Dirty Tricks,” NYT Week in Review, April 29, 1973, p. 213. “I don’t know”“The Administration; Ripping Open an Incredible Scandal,” Time, April 30 1973.
78 Then, the staggering“Trials: Practicing on Ellsberg,” Time, May 7, 1973; “Ellsberg Says His Trial Now Seems to Be Political,” NYT, April 29, 1973, p. 1.
79 A newsweekly quoted “Investigations: The Newest Daytime Drama,” Time, May 28, 1973. A distinguished British Peregrine Worsthorne, “Suggestions of a Banana Republic,” NYT, April 23, 1973, p. 33. Theodore White announced “Big Money, Dirty Tricks,” NYT Week in Review, April 29, 1973, p. 213.
79 “I want to talk” “Address to the Nation About the Watergate Investigations,” April 30, 1973, UCSB; watch here.
80 The Associated Press April 30. 1973.
81 He offered his UPI, May 1, 1973; “Reagan: Watergate Spies No Criminals,” WP, May 2, 1973, p. A10.
81 “Political Spies not ‘Criminals’” LAT, May 2, 1973, p. A25. NBC’s John Chancellor: NBC News, May 2, 1973. Tom Wicker used: “Gooks, Slopes and Vermin,” NYT, May 4, 1973, p. 37.
81 Time ran a “The Nation: Who’s Up…And Who’s Down,” Time, May 21, 1973.
82 In 1968 he Rick Perlstein, Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America (New York: Scribner, 2008), pp. 281-283, 297-300.
82 He told his experts Reagan interview, “Governor Reagan and His Cabinet” oral history, pp. 20-21, California State Archives.
82 Dwight D. Eisenhower told “People in the News,” AP, June 6, 1966. NBC’s David Brinkley Editorial, NBC News, March 18 ,1969.
83 “I’d like to harness”Perlstein, Nixonland, p. 113. And said he “The View From Here,” Lodi News-Sentinel, October 19, 1965. “It’s silly talking” Sean Wilentz, The Age of Reagan: A History, 1984-2008 (New York: Harper, 2008), p. 22.
83 “As far as I’m” Kiron K. Skinner, Annalise Anderson, and Martin Anderson, eds., Reagan: A Life in Letters (New York: Free Press, 2004, p. 1
83 Eureka: “Sounds like” Sidney Skolsky, “Hollywood Is My Beat” column, Hollywood Citizen News, February 8, 1949, AEP box 60, folder 13. He said that Anne Edwards, Early Reagan: The Rise to Power (New York: William & Morrow, 1985), p. 82. Getting there: Ibid., p. 72-73, 82-83; Skolsky interview. He had never swum Author interview with Professor Junius Rodriguez of Eureka College. See alsoReagan to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lightfoot, February 6, 1985 in Skinner et al., Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 25.
83 And college to him See for example 1952 commencement address, William Wood College, in AEP box 63, folder 18; reprinted in Anne Edwards, The Reagans: Portrait of a Marriage (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2003), p. 369; Garry Wills, Reagan’s America: Innocents At Home (New York: Doubleday, 1986), p. 36;Reagan to Dr. Paul Flipkowski, late 1960s or early 1970s, Skinner et al., Reagan: A Life in Letters, p. 20.
83 Immediately, he pledged Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 83.
84 No one, even now See Ralph Keyes interviews with Stansfield Major, Sam Herrod, Ira Langston, Ernest Higdon, Bill Major, Howard and mary Reesman, Irene Reynolds, Howard K. Adams, and Burris Dickinson, in possession of author ; Ralph Keyes article, Newsday, February 12, 1969; “Students Strike at Eureka College,” NYT, November 29, 1928, p. 23; “Eureka Students Ask Removal of College President,” CT, November 23, 1928, p. 3; “The Small College Fights for Life,” St. Paul Dispatch, reprinted in “Editorial of the Day,” CT, December 11, 1928, p. 12; Wills, Reagan’s America, pp. 52-63
84 He made the strike Ronald Reagan with Richard Hubler, Where’s the Rest of Me? (New York: Duell, Sloan & Pierce, 1965), Chapter Three.
86 “You know, I read” Ralph Keyes interview with Stansfield Major.
86 “Dutch Reagan’s debut” “We Understand That…” gossip column, Eureka Pegasus, February 26, 1929. the word that reappears Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 94. eagerly stitching himselfPegasus, May 12, 1932 senior bios; Prism 1930 yearbook. Thanks to the staff at the Eureka College Library for helping me review these materials.
86 “‘Eureka Spirit’—it is”Pegasus, February 8, 1930. For the context of this sort of 1920s college ritual see Paula Fass, The Damned and the Beautiful: American Youth in the 1920s (New York: Oxford University, 1979).
86 “one of the best” Stansfield Major interview. “Although ‘Dutch’ failed” 1930 Prism, leading the football pages. “He never quit” Keyes interview with Ralph McKenzie. He scored his: Bill Flick, “Reagan Never Forgot His Illinois Roots,” The Pantagraph, February 4, 2011.”I was afraid”: Edwards, Early Reagan, p. 95.
87 In his junior “Homecoming Plans Nearly Completed,” Pegasus, October 11, 1931, p. 1. a “lively discussion”Pegasus, March 19. 1931, p. 1.
87 There was one Keyes interviews with Ernest Higdon and Alma Steider. See also Pegasus, October 11, October 23, October 30, and November 5, 1931.
87 “We had a special” Reagan, Where’s the Rest of Me?, p. 33.
88 “Around the neck”: Craig Shirley, Reagan’s Revolution: The Untold Story of the Campaign that Started It All (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2005), p. 105.
88 “able-bodied malingerers” Steven V. Robrerts, “Ronald Reagan Is Giving ‘Em Heck,” NYTM, October 25, 1970, SM22.
88 Then, when it Seth Rosenfeld, Subersives: The FBI’s War on Student Radicals, and Reagan’s Rise to Power (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012). “to subsidize intellectual” Roberts, “Ronald Reagan Is Giving ‘Em Heck.” “brats,” “freaks,” and “cowardly” Ibid. “Academic freedom does not” NBS News, June 19, 1970, VNA. When one of the founders Author interview with Richard Flacks.
88 Of the sixty-seven times Reviewed at VNA. “if Eldridge Cleaver” Seth Rosenfeld, Subversives, p. 425. “Ronald Reagan is a” Ibid.
89 Reagan, on ABC September 20, 1968. On NBC Reagan January 7, 1969. the governor respondedSaturday Review, January 14, 1973.
89 “When you see” CBS News, February 10, 1969.
90 “The police didn’t” Rosenfeld, Subversives, p. 470. Reagan made a similar argument about the assassination the previous year of Robert F. Kenendy. See Ibid., p. 416-417.
90 “If it’s to be” Roberts, “Ronald Reagan Is Giving ‘Em Heck.”
90 “Life profiled him” “Conservative Is the Way to Sound,” Life, October 30, 1970.
91 “Around the mouth” Craig Shirley, Reagan’s Revolution: The Untold Story of the Campaign that Started It All (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2005), p. 105.
91 Ronald Reagan’s closest Ibid., p. 22. Reagan said he intended Lou Cannon, Governor Reagan: His Rise to Power (New York: Public Affairs, 2004), pp. 369-371.It pointed out revelations “Reagan Vows Not to Talk About Watergate With Press Anymore,” LAT, May 16, 1973, p. A3. “economic war” Cannon, Governor Reagan, p. 371. “Are we automatically” James J. Kilpatrick column, June 13, 1973.
92 A CBS reporter CBS News, April 6, 1973.
92 Nightclub comics “Lighter Side of Watergate Scandal,” NYT, May 6, 1973, p. 45. Nixon’s approval ratings: “Gallup Poll Hints Scandal Dims G.O.P.’s ’74 Outlook,” NYT, May 10, 1973, p. 36. “Watergate morality” See LAT, June 27, 1973 religion page ads for sermons including “Watergate—Moral Crisis” and “Watergate—Who Is Our God?” keep up with cascading “The Watergate Week,” NYT Week in Review, NYT, May 13, 1973, p. 191.
92 Yet here was Ronald “Reagan Vows Not to Talk About Watergate With Press Anymore; Governor Says Issue Is ‘Non of My Business’ and He Feels Too Much Time Has Been Spent on It With Media,” LAT, May 16, 1973, p. A3.
93 “Eden before Eve” “Silas Snobden’s Office Boy: A Sanctuary of Male Innocence,” NYT, March 25, 1973, p. 445. “If it has never” “New Alger Novel, First Since 1910, Due Friday,” NYT, January 28, 1973, p. 51. What the jacket copy Horatio Adler, Silas Snobden’s Office Boy (New York: Doubleday, 1973). The Los Angeles Times welcomed “Pluck Still Plays,” LAT, January 31, 1973, p. C6. Publishers Weekly pronounced See paperback jacket.
93 “Does Watergate have coattails?” Richard M. Scammon and Ben J. Wattenberg, “Politics of Watergate: A Dialogue,” WP, May 20, 1973, p. C1.
 
 
CHAPTER SIX: SAM ERVIN
 
94 White-haired, jiggly-jowled: William J. Shannon, They Could Not Trust the King: Nixon, Watergate, and the American People (New York: Macmillan, 1973), p. 37; Stanley Kutler, The Wars of Watergate: The Last Crisis of Richard Nixon (New York: Knopf, 1990), p. 225; “Investigations: Defying Nixon’s Reach for Power,” Time, April 16, 1973.
95 “If the many” HSCPCA Book 1, p. 1.
95 “Dreary Odle delved” Ibid., pp. 9-74; viewed at PCM.
95 Then, the next day HSCPCA Book 1, pp. 118-125; viewed at PCM.
98 The committee reconvened HSCPCA Book 1, pp. 191-248. A man burst “3 Men, 2 Women: 5 Evicted from Watergate Hearings,” CT, May 25, 1973, p. 7; James Naugton, “Watergate Raises Serious Governmental and Constitutional Issues,” NYT, June 17, 1973, p. 44.
98 A housewife wrote Nancy Ballantine, “Today’s Living,” Louisville Courier-Journal, June 2, 1973. Volume at the AP, June 24, 1973. inflation was at its highest Ibid. On the funny pages “Berry’s World,” June 10, 1973. Some high schools: author interviews. The Boston Globe Edwin Diamond column, Boston Globe, June 8, 1973. the maître d’ AP, May 19, 1973.
98 A Maryland congressman “U.S., Md. Authorities Probe Shotgun Death of Rep. Mills,” WP, May 26, 1973, p. A9.
99 “I sit in constant” AP, May 19, 1973. “presides in front: “The Presidency by Hugh Sidey: The Failures of Nixon’s Staff,” Time, May 7, 1973. “The president had been”: “Watergate on TV,” Montreal Gazette, May 22, 1973. “NIXON CONCEDES WIDE” NYT, May 23, 1973, p. 1.
99 The statement read “Statement About the Watergate Investigations,” May 22, 1973, UCSB.
99 The wiretaps had Seymour Hersh, “President Linked to Taps on Aides,” NYT, May 16, 1973, p. 1. The 1970 intelligence AP, May 22, 1973.
100 The Times said “A Proper Forum,” NYT, June 15, 1973, p. 36. A political cartoonistLouisville Courier-Journal, June 1, 1973. Another depicted Herblock from WP, reprinted in Ibid. In a thirdSt. Louis Post-Dispatch, June 6, 1973.
100 In Richardson’s confirmation AP, May 18, 1973. “countermand or interfere” UPI, May 18 1973. “not criminal, just illegal” UPI, June 5, 1973.
100 The week before “Brezhnev’s Summit Visit To U.S. Scheduled June 18,” NYT, May 13, 1973.
100 The festivities began UPI, May 25, 1973. “Had we not” “Remarks at a Reception for Returned Prisoners of War,” May 24, 1973, UCSB. See also Marquis Childs column, August 27, 1973, which points out a lie in his speech about Watergate amid the speech’s “half a dozen patriotic themes.”
101 The heroes moved ABC News, May 24, 1973, VNA; “Wives Kiss Nixon, Kissinger: Ex-POWs Dine at White House,” p. A21. By this time all three network news organizations were featuring daily editorial roundups on the day’s Ervin committee testimony.
101 He led a rousing Andreas Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown: Watergate, Warhol, and the Birth of Post-Sixties America (New York: Bloomsbury USA, 2007), pp. 99. See also Michael Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home: Ibid.; Michael Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home: POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam War (Charlotte: University of North Carolina Press, 2009), p. 82.On “POW Hymn” see “Former POW Turns Tables on Bob Hope,” LAT, December 26, 1973, p. B4.
101 The former FBI HSCPCA Book 1, pp. 391-410. (the former agent was Al Baldwin). Cuban burglar Bernard Ibid., pp. 357-389; see also AP, May 25, 1973. Barker testimony clips viewed on “Bill Moyers Journal: Essay on Watergate,” October 31, 1973; also viewable here, 4:04-6:37.
102 ABC gave nine ABC News, May 24, 1973, VNA.
102 A titillating AP LAT, May 25, 1973, p. B2; see here.
102 Evangelical Christians hadChristianity Today, May 25, 1973, on “Youth for Christ” rally at Kansas City Royals Stadium, and Gospel Films of Grand Rapids, Michigan, producing TV movie, In the Presence of My Enemies, Howard and Phyllis Rutledge with Mel and Lyla White, and Jim Irwin’s “spiritual renewal” retreats with POWs.
102 A dominant narrative Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown, p. 83; Craig Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs: Witnesses to their Flight (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), pp. 143-144; “39 Ex-P.O.W.s Divorced Or in the Divorce Process,” NYT, June 12, 1973, p. 2; Natasha Zaretsky, No Direction Home; The American Famiyl and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980 (Charlotte: University of North Carolina Press, 2007), p. 48, 56-57, 254; “Michael Christian Comes Home,” McCall’s, February, 1974; and “Operation Homecoming: Psychological Observations of Repatriated Vietnam Prisoners of War,” Psychiatry (February, 1975), pp. 65-74. One could read “POW for 8 Years Divorces Wife,” LAT, June 24, 1973, p. 17. or how the AP, April 22, 1973. or that the Zaretsky, No Direction Home, p. 49. At the gala Ibid., p. 57-58.
103 especially in California Laura Kalman, Right Star Rising: A New Politics, 1974-1980 (New York: W.W. Norton, 2010), pp. 75-76; “The Broken Family”: Newsweek, March 12, 1973. See also Stephanie Coontz, “Divorce, No-Fault Style,” NYT, June 16, 2010, and the movie The Misfits (1961), in which Marilyn Monroe’s character awkwardly practices her fraudulent account of marital abuse in front of a mirror to prepare to give it to a judge, in order to win a divorce from a man she merely can’t stand.
103 It’s Not the End of the World Scarsdale, New York: Bradbury Press, 1972. The Boys and Girls Book About Divorce: Richard Gardner, M.D., The Boys and Girls Book About Divorce (New York: Science House, 1970). Time review: “Behavior: A Child’s Guide to Divorce,” October 26, 1970.
104 “I would not give” Five-part series in Pekin Daily Times, June, 1973, viewed at Pekin, Illinois Public Library, copies in possession of author. A decade earlier Pat Boone, Between You, Me, and the Gatepost: A Heart-to-Heart Message for Teen-Agers (Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1960). Paperback cover blurb reads, “100,000 copies sold at $2.95. The book was the tenth best-selling nonfiction title of 1960.
104 The previous year Kathryn C. Montgomery, Target, Prime Time: Advocy Groups and the Struggle Over Entertainment Television (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990), pp. 36-37, 75-79; Jesse Sheidlower, The F-Word (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009), p. 75. In 1969, 68 percent: Morton Hunt, Sexual Behavior in the 1970s (Los Angeles: Playboy Press Books, 1974), p. 21.
104 Later, Masters and Johnson Thomas Maier, Masters of Sex: The Life and Times of William Masters and Virginia Johnson, the Couple Who Taught America How to Love (New York: Basic Books, 2009). The aim of their work “Masters and Johnson—a ‘Square’ Private Life,’” LAT, September 5, 1973, p. A10.
105 Dr. David Reuben’sEverything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex but Were Afraid to Ask (New York: David McKay, 1969), p. 52. Other volumes littering “J,” The Sensuous Woman (New York: Lyle Stuart, 1969);Nancy Friday, My Secret Garden: Women’s Sexual Fantasies (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1973). “The Sensuous Car” Newsweek, March 12, 1973.
105 it made $25 million Elana Levine, Wallowing in Sex: The New Sexual Culture of 1970s American Television (Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Pres, 2007), pp. 1-2. “feast of carrion” “The Broken Family,” sidebar, Newsweek, March 12, 1973. the projectionist showed Jon C. Hopwood, “Artie Mitchell, Porno Pioneer: Porn Prince and Sex Industry Impressario Was Adulty Entertainment’s ‘Abel,’” Yahoo! Voices, October 28, 2008. The cover of a book Jackie and Jeff Herrigan, Loving Free (New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1973). The authors undertook “Writers’ Publicity Efforts a Labor of Love,” Milwaukee Journal, July 29, 1974; copy inscribed to suburban Milwaukee married couple of the author’s acquaintance, in author’s possession.
106 “The couple at the next”: John H. Nasymth, Jr., “One Year Later, a Former POW Finds Life ‘Nearly Perfect’—but for One Thing,” LAT, February 20, 1974, p. C7.
106 Researchers at the Kinsey Hunt, Sexual Behavior in the 1970s, p. 147.
106 “I’ve been visiting”Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown, p. 80. “Prosepctive Wife Analysis Chart”: Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 143-144. “Well, six months later” “POWs: Picking Up the Pieces,” WP, December 4, 1975, p. E1.
106 “I could either” “P.O.W. Wives Who Chose New Life Face Dilemma,” NYT, March 6, 1973, p. 10.
107 On the Freedom Birds AP, January 29, 1973; “First Prisoner Release Is Completed; Arrival at Clark Base Is Filled With Emotion,” NYT, February 13, 1973, p. 77; AP, February 19, 1973. That was where: “Playboy’s Playmate of the Month: Miss January,” Playboy, January, 1973. See the centerfold here (not safe for work).
107 “Do you want anything”: Gay Talese, Thy Neighbor’s Wife (New York: Doubleday, 1980), p. 602.
107 “to get an audience” “POWs at Dinner,” LAT, May 31, 1973, p. D6. “How many spectacular” “Letters to the Editor,” NYT, June 4, 1973, p. 35. A new Gallup George Gallup column, May 24, 1973.
108 And new Watergate “Friend of Nixon Is Identified as Backer in Purchase of Western White House,” NYT, May 26, 1973, p. 65; Government Paid $39,525 to Improve Nixon’s Home,” NYT, May 27, 1973, p. 1; “Nixon’s Bowling Alley a Gift from Rebozo,” June 21, 1973, p. 57; “Government Spends $1.8 Million on Nixon’s Coastal White House,” New Orleans Times-Picayune, June 22, 1973. “Nixon is absolutely right”Detroit News, June 19 1973.
108 G. Bradford Cook “Cook Cites A ‘Web’ Of Factors; SEC Head Quits Over Vesco Scandal,” WP, May 17, 1973, p. A1. Vesco himself was “Vesco Is Linked to Contributions in the Bahamas,” Louisville Courier-Journal, June 3, 1973. Elliot Richardson, the new Nicholas von Hoffman, “Watergate Lies Moving Closer to the Truth,” CT, May 30., p. 24.
108 More fake letter-writing AP, June 5, 1973. bribes from the dairy Jack Anderson column, June 6, 1973. Howard Hunt sent “Colson Says He Ordered Hunt Trip,” WP, June 15, 1973, p. A15. American Airlines confessing UPI, July 7, 1973. Revelations that Howard Hunt “Hunt Tells of Orders to Raid Bremer’s Flat,” New York Post, June 21, 1973. Accusations that HuntNewsweek, June 18, 1973.
108 A typical network newscast See June 1, 1973, ABC, NBC, CBS, VNS. A May 28 Louis Harris column, Man 28, 1973. Plain-speaking Midwesterners Jack Mabley, “Minor Lewis Novel Is Disturbing Now,” CT, May 27, 1973, p. 4.
109 On Memorial Day UPI, May 28, 1973. in Milwaukee “Peace Called Memorial to War Dead,” Milwaukee Sentinel, May 28, 1973.
109 The next day front-page “Charges POWs Aided Foe; Colonel Names 8 Men,” CT, May 30, 1973, p. 1; see AP, May 30, 1973. A Peace Committee member AP, May 31, 1973.
109 “A decision to” “Falling Out Among the Heroes,” NYT Week in Review, June 3, 1973, p. 207.
109 Next, a POW AP, June 5, 1973; Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs, p. 12.
110 The Pentagon tried: Richmond News-Leader editorial, June 9, 1973. “we are witness”: Reagan to Rev. B.H. Cleaver, May 24, 1973, in Kiron K. Skinner, Annalise Anderson, and Martin Anderson, eds., Reagan: A Life in Letters (New York: Free Press, 2004), p. 94.
110 She referred to “Jane Fonda Amplifies on Her POW Stand,” LAT, June 9, 1973, p. A4.
110 Clem Zablocki, meanwhile Allen, Until the Last Man Comes Home, p. 98.“Why are you willing” Ibid., p. 91.
111 In January, Senator “America’s Energy Crisis,” Newsweek, January 22, 1973.
111 White House aideDes Moines Register, January 18, 1973, p. 20. Thousands of othersChristianity Today, June 22, 1973. The “Skylab” space station Alexander Hopkins McDannald, ed. Yearbook of the Encyclopedia Americana (New York: Grolliers, 1974) p. 524. “Don’t worry,” a NASA CT, May 15, 1973.
111 “Popeye is running” Newsweek, January 22, 1973. In 1955 the chairman Thomas Borteslmann, The 1970s: A New Global History from Civil Rights to Economic Inequality (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2013), p. 54. In 1966 a government Andrew Scott Cooper, The Oil Kings; How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia Changed the Balance of Power in the Middle East (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011), p. 90. “was acting in concert” “Gasoline Shortage Laid to U.S. Policy,” Milwaukee Journal, May 30 1973.Senator Walter Mondale AP, July 11, 1973.
112 In Los Angeles, beaches “Sewage Flow Into L.A. Harbor Halted, Water Still Unsafe,” LAT, June 21, 1973, p. A3. In New Jersey, thick “Red Tide Poses Threat to Bathers Again,” NYT, July 1, 1973, p. 1; “New Jersey Briefs,” June 28, 1973, p. 98. A billion-pound plague “Focus on Forces Unknown Puts Doom in Perspective,” CT, February 13, 1973, p. A3. Also see that piece for earthquakes, volcanoes, Jerusalem snowstorm, fish kills, floating islands. “A growing, man-made” “The Sludge: Nature Take Offense,” LAT, January 10, 1973, p. B6. Two years earlier ““Focus on Forces Unknown Puts Doom in Perspective,” CT.
112 The Club of Rome See Robert C. Collins, More: The Politics of Growth in Postwar America (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 139-145. Another perennial bestseller Paul Erhlich, The Population Bomb (New York: Ballentine, 1969). “The industrial society” Collins, More, p. 143.
113 “We’ve messed up” Hunt, Sexual Behavior in the 1970s, p. 62. “consider thy heavens” Christianity Today, June 22, 1973. In Burlington, Vermont “The Nation: Operation Brownout,” Time, April 23, 1973. A Chicago Tribune reader:“Useless Luxuries,” CT, May 30, 1973, p. 22.
113 Mobil: “Smart drivers” SeeMilwaukee Journal, May 30 1973. Senators urged states AP, June 4, 1973. “the oversized, overpowered” “‘Cars Too Big!’”, CT, June 13, 1973, p. 20. Soylent Green See letter to the editor from JoAnn Broecker, LAT, September 28, 1973, p. B6: “Help! Will someone please tell me, are we all part of a science fiction novel? Although I live only a mile from the mountains, most days I can’t see them. The pine trees are turning a grayish dun color…. “Twice during summer, a helicopter circulated over our area, booming instructions to all children to stop playing and to get in their houses…We cried that day. Anxiously, I read the Times every day, hoping for some positive news….”
113 The Los Angeles mayoral See the excellent discussion in McDannald, ed. Yearbook of the Encyclopedia America, p. 176.
114 Richard Nixon’s new AP, June 16, 1973. In Georgia, Governor CarterRichmond News Leader, June 8, 1973.
114 “can’t-do nation” Walter J. Bowan, CT, June 23, 1973, p. 10. And Ronald Reagan said AP ,May 23, 1973.
115 “the most ludicrous” Reg Murphy column, Atlanta Constitution, May 23, 1973. The Wall Street Journal’s“Quick Fixing the Gas Shortage,” WSJ, June 12, 1973, p. 26.
115 “on the back burner” “Watergate Halts Library Plan,” NYT, May 23, 1973, p. 97. the Week in Review: “Buried By Its Own Landslide: The G.O.P. Watergate Fallout,” NYT, May 27, 1973, p. 152. NBC News did June 1, 1973.
 
 
CHAPTER SEVEN: JOHN DEAN
 
116 “[T]he executive branch” Clark Clifford, “A Government of National Unity,” NYT, June 4, 1973 1973, p. 36. The Times reprinted the same piece on October 29, 1973, p. 35.
117 Pat Buchanan, Nixon’s: Patrick Buchanan, “A White House Response,” NYT, June 11, 1973, p. 35. A former Republican congressman Jessie Sumner, “A Leftist Coup,” CT, July 19, 1973, p. 12.
117 “sabotaging our country” Steve Doring, Richmond News Leader, June 8, 1973. “has made us appear” Henry Regnery, “Press Self-Deceiving,” CT, May 23, 1973, p. 16. “Making an irresponsible” G.R. Nelson, “Contrasting Critics,” CT, May 18 1973, p. 16. “a disgrace to downgrade” (Mrs.) H.H. Moore, Richmond News Leader, June 8, 1973. They did so H. Mack Thaxton, “Nobel Prize for Nixon,” CT, May 29, 1973, p. 12.
117 “magnificent Americans who” Theodore R. Bledsoe, “Supports the President,” WP, June 1, 1973, p. A25. Ronald Reagan, for his Richard Reeves, “Old Faces of ’73 Lying in Wait for ’76,” New York, December 24, 1973, p. 6.“It’s time for us” “Watergate Silence Advocated by Reagan,” LAT, June 5, 1973, p. A7.
118 “sure as hell” Theodore R. Bledsoe, “Supports the President,” WP, June 1, 1973, p. A25.
118 “pack of howling” Mrs. Robert Brauham, “The Watergate Scandal,” CT, May 12, 1973, p. W12. “been trying to discredit” Richard Riggs, “Letters to the Times: ‘No Cries for Nixon’s Impeachment,” LAT, May 3, 1973, p. C6. “nobody was murdered” C.A. Nolan, Louisville Courier Journal, June 4, 1973. “while the President [was]” Roy E. Hager, “The Watergate Scandal,” CT, May 12, 1973, p. W12.
118 “innuendo may pass” Editorial, Dallas Morning News, April 3, 1973, reprinted in Congressional Quarterly, Watergate: Chronology of a Crisis (Washington: Congressional Quarterly, 1975), p. 149. “The liberal politicians” Edmund H. North, “Letters to the Times: The Watergate Scandal and the Presidency,” LAT, May 11, 1973, p. D6. “Certain people can” Editorial, Burlington Free Press, April 4, 1973, reprinted in Congressional Quarterly, Watergate, p. 153. “There is one Watergate” J. Kesner Kahn, “Reds and Watergate,” CT, June 8, 1973, p. 16.
119 “childish pranksterism compared” Vera Drehman, “Response to Watergate,” CT, May 15, 1973, p. 12. “I keep being reminded” Gil Felhoelter, Louisville Courier Journal, June 6, 1973.
119 William F. Buckley See Buckley, “Impeach the speech, not the President,” NYTM, May 20, 1973, p. 284; WFB column, June 6, 1973. Nick Thimmesch See Thimmesch, “Other Interests than Watergate,” CT, May 31, 1973, p. 18. National Review’s Jeffrey Hart See Hart column, June 4, 1973. the Richmond News Leader Philip J. Hilts, “The Saga of James J. Kilpatrick; The Terror of Richmond Rode North,” WP magazine, p. PO12. Kilpatrick was the News Leader’s editor.
119 Baruch Korff David Greenberg, Nixon’s Shadow: The History of an Image (New York: W.W. Norton, 2003), pp. 180-184.
119 “If Senator McCarthy” Katherine Jansen, CST, June 11, 1973.
120 “Watching Watergate in” New York, June 18, 1973.
121 Elliott Roosevelt, son Elliott Roosvelt, Letters to the Editor, NYT, June 27, 1973, p. 38. “Only he can sweep” “Up to the President,” NYT, April 1, 1973, p. 244.
121 “Orange County Boys” Hugh Sidey, “The Presidency: The Failures of Nixon’s Staff,” Time, May 7, 1973, reprinted here. “wrong sort” Stewart Alsop, “Watergate Was War, Not Politics,” Newsweek, quoted here.
121 Syndicated columnist Bill Anderson See Bill Anderson columns, April 17, 1973, May 2, 1973, May 24, 1973, June 15, 1973, CT. “Nixon has a staff infection” “Show Business: Watergate Wit,” Time, June 25, 1973. “It is of considerable” Hugh Sidey, “The Presidency: The Failures of Nixon’s Staff,” Time, May 7, 1973, reprinted here.
122 “They appeared to understand” Peter Lisagor column, June 24, 1973.
122 The latest news was “Spying Missions and 2 Wiretaps Laid to Ehrlichman by Officials,” NYT, June 6, 1973, p. 1. See also Joseph Kraft column, June 16, 1973. “Henry Kissinger the Virtuoso”: WP, May 27, 1973, p. C7. “How Kissinger Fooled”: Nick Thimmesch, New York, June 4, 1973.
122 “this very bizarre incident” “The President’s News Conference,” August 29, 1972, UCSB. Dean then showed “FBI’s Gray: At Least a Whiff of Politics,” NYT Week in Review, March 4, 1973, p. 194.
123 And then the news “Senate Unit May Summon Nixon Aide,” NYT, March 13, 1973; Chapter Nine, “Going Public,” John Dean, Blind Ambition: The White House Years (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1976); “Nixon-Dean Logs May Be Yielded: White House Shifts Stand, May Yield Nixon-Dean Logs,” WP, June 6, 1973. “We categorically deny” AP, June 4, 1973.
123 Joseph Alsop spoke column, June 12, 1973.
122 “The American people are” Staff of the New York Times, ed., The Watergate Hearings: Break-in-and Cover-up (New York: Viking Press, 1973, p. 116; AP, June 4, 1973. The Louisville Courier-Journal Editorial, June 6, 1973.
124 The next day HSPCA, Book 2, pp. 532-631.
125 That same day California AP, June 7, 1973. The next morning “Documents Show Nixon Approved Partly ‘Illegal’ ’70 Security Plan,” NYT, p. 1.
126 Sloan was followed HSPCA, Book 2, pp. 631-687.Time called him” “The Nation: The Man Who Keeps Asking Why, Time, July 9, 1973.“stud list” Leslie Stahl, Reporting Live (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000), p. 29.
126 A twenty-three-year-old Interview, Michael Geoghegan. A kid in Worthington Interview, Bill Martin. An eleven-year-old Interview, Howard Park. A ten-year-old Barack Obama, Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 144.
127 A Washington Post reader Gilbert Couts, “No Canned Laughter,” WP, June 1, 1973, p. A25. A man from Chicago Otto Boutin, CT, June 15, 1973.
127 Two hundred of them “Impeachment Inquiry Asked in House,” WP, June 13, 1973, p. A10; “Inquiry Is Urged on Impeachment,” NYT, June 13, 1973, p. 34; “Liberals Want Inquiry on President’s Conduct,” LAT, June 13, 1973, p. 8. “You’d have to be crazy” Joseph Alsop column, June 12, 1973.
127 On June 12 HSPCA, Book 2, pp. 657-719. Then it was Maurice Stans’s Ibid., p. 719-783.
128 That was Same Ervin See Stanley Kutler, The Wars of Watergate: The Last Crisis of Richard Nixon (New York: Knopf, 1990), p. 258.
129 “Pull mah string” CT, July 31, 1973, p. 8. “all witnesses are guilty” Robert Acom, “End TV Hearings,” CT, August 3, 1973, p. 16. “resembles my grandfather” “Sen. Ervin,” LAT, October 14, 1973, p. J2.
129 He dismissed Watergate Kutler, The Wars of Watergate, p. 256. a“catastrophic effect” Ibid. p. 352.
129 “They wanted it” HSPCA, Book 2, p. 756.
130 “Maurice Stans, President Nixon’s” Milwaukee Sentinel, June 14, 1973.
132 The nineteenth witness HSPCA, Book 2, p. 783-877; viewed on “Bill Moyers Journal: Essay on Watergate,” October 31, 1973. “Coffin’s higher law” Ibid. “Jesus and Jimmy Hoffa”: Washington Star, June 25, 1973. “I used to say” William Sloan Coffin, “‘Not Yet a Good Man,’” NYT, June 19, 1973, p. 39.
132 The building had “Names in the News,” Atlanta Constitution, May 27, 1973. “like a national funeral”New Orleans Times-Picayune, June 24, 1973, p. 1.
132 “fine heavy-quality towel” See ad in LAT, June 17, 1973. “A jigsaw puzzle” See full-page ad in LAT, June 13, 1973, p. SF3. “No one wins” Watergate Scandal card game in collection of author. The Watergate Comedy Hour See “Glad You Asked That” column, Miami News, June 5, 1973. Sing a Song of Watergate Ibid. “DON’T BUG ME”: Ad in LAT, July 29, 1973. Other side read “Member USA Watergate Team.” “Candles for those” LAT, August 19, 1973.
133 Harry Reasoner of ABC ABC News, May 24, 1973, VNA.
133 an “unknown word” “Behind the Barricades,” CT, June 23, 1973, p. S10. In his speech “Remarks at the Unveiling of the Cornerstone of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Congressional Leadership Research Center, Pekin, Illinois,” June 15, 1973, UCSB.
133 In Washington on June 18 Letter to the Editor, “Is the Cold War Forgotten,” WP, July 3, 1973, p. A17.
134 “I just think” James Mann, The Rebellion of Ronald Reagan: A History of the End of the Cold War (New York: Viking, 2008), p. 19.
134 Monday’s Time magazine “Investigations: Guerrilla Warfare at Credibility Gap,” Time July 2, 1973.
134 “had distinguished himself” “When Mr. Dean Talks,” WSJ, June 14, 1973, p. 16. In Central Park: Tom Panelas. In suburban D.C.: AP, May 10, 1973.
135 ABC’s voluble Capitol Hill Viewed at PCM.
136 “Laughter,” he had told Dean, Blind Ambition, p. 304.
136 First he explained See full text, HSPCA, Book 4.
137 House Republicans skipped ENIR, June 29, 1973.
141 Carol Channing, it arrived “Creating a New Who’s Who,” Time, July 9 1973; Andreas Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown: Watergate, Warhol, and the Birth of Post-Sixties America (New York: Bloomsbury USA, 2007), pp. 145; “List of White House ‘Enemies’ and Memorandums Relating to Those Named,’ NYT, June 28, 1973, p. 38; “Some Who Made ‘Dean’s List’ Honored; Others Voice Outrage,” NYT, June 28, 1973, p. 38; “Scores of Names,” NYT, June 28, 1973, p. 97. For Joe Namath and Olympics see Dave Anderson, “Political Football,” NYT, July 1, 1973, p. 160. For dog dish story see John Peirson, “A Report From Our Man on the ‘Enemy List,’” WSJ, July 2, 1973, p. 10.
142 A gag book Julio Fernandez, White House Enemies; or, How We Made the Dean’s List (New York: Signet, 1973). William F. Buckley Jr. said Column, July 9, 1973.
142 Charles Colson, its “Colson Denies Writing Presidential Enemies List,” New Orleans Times-Picayune, June 28, 1973, p. 3. A document introduced See HSPCA, Book 4, pp. 1256, 1689.
143 presently, “enemies” from “Corrupting the IRA,” NYC, June 29, 1973, p. 36; “Creating a New Who’s Who,” Time, July 9 1973. At a February meeting “The Hearings: Dean’s Case Against the President,” Time, July 9. 1973. “give the President” Ibid; Staff of the London Sunday Times, Watergate (New York: Harper, 1973), p. 258, Kutler, The Wars of Watergate, p. 361.
143 “The sum of your” HSPCA, Book 4, p. 1466.
144 A White House spokesman “Separation of Powers Is Cited: Nixon Won’t Testify in Inquiry,” WP, July 8, 1973, p. A1.
 
 
 
CHAPTER EIGHT: NOSTALGIA
 
145 Who was under AP, July 7, 1973.
145 In Atlantic City, boxer “Wepner Awarded Disputed Decision; Terrell’s Trainer Is Kept From Attacking Referee,” NYT, June 24, 1973, p. 195. In Texas, an industrial AP, June 26, 1973. In New Orleans UPI, June 26, 1973. Former Illinois governor UPI, April 19, 1973. Democratic senator Jim Abourezk UPI, June 4, 1973.
145 The U.S. Air Force Academy “Dropouts Plague the Air Academy,” NYT, June 2, 1973, p. 1. Then came news “Air Force Academy Concedes Injuries at Mock P.O.W. Camp,” NYT, July 1, 1973, p. 26.
146 Pentagon studies disclosed AP, July 9 1973. At West Point, nineteen “Armed Services: An End to Silence,” Time, June 18 1973. “The whole academy”“Letters,” Time, July 18, 1973.
146 Admiral Stockdale filed Craig Howes, Voices of the Vietnam POWs: Witnesses to their Flight (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), p. 12; UPI, June 27, 1973; “Marine P.O.W., 24, Charged With Collaboration, Kills Himself,” NYT, June 28, 1973, p. 7; “Army Set to Drop POW Case,” CT, July 3, 1973; “7 Former P.O.W.’s Freed of Charges of Aiding Enemy,” NYT, July 4, 1973, p. 4. The suicide, James Kavanaugh, did not know at the time of his act that the Pentagon had decided to drop his prosecution.
146 “The Roman Empire” “Our Country Crumbling,” CT, July 2, 1973, p. 16.
146 Mitchell offered no HSCPCA Book 4, pp. 1601-1681; Stanley Kutler, The Wars of Watergate: The Last Crisis of Richard Nixon (New York: Knopf, 1990), p. 364.
148 The president, if unconsciously Personal communication with Dr. S. Nassir Ghaemi, professor of psychiatry, Tulane School of Medicine, author of A First Rate Madness: Uncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Illness (New York: Penguin, 2011). His personal physicianDes Moines Register, July 13, 1973, p. 6; “Nixon Hospitalized With Pneumonia; Week’s Stay Seen,” LAT, July 13, 1973, p. 3A.
148 The Secret Service Ibid. Mental Illness “40% of Mail from ‘Down Home’ Assails Ervin,” LAT, August 1, 1973, p. 14.
148 Sitting before the television HSCPCA Book 5, pp. 2073-2090; viewed at PCM.
149 The Washington Post’s first “Mission Incredible,” WP, June 21, 1972, p. A22. A Time cover April 30, 1973. a New York Times Week: May 20, 1973. Senator Lowell Weicker Kutler, Wars of Watergate, p. 362; HSCPCA Book 4, p. 1500. On the funny pages June 2, 1973. Francis Ford Coppola’s AP, September 7 1972.
149 “of course for historical” “The Tapes Were Meant to Be Heard, But Not Quite Yet: The Oral History That Has Become a Current Event,” NYT Week in Review, May 26, 1974, p. 159.
150 The first scene Staff of the London Sunday Times, Watergate (New York: Harper), p. 260; John J. Sirica, To Set the Record Straight: The Break-in, The Tapes, The Conspirators, The Pardon (New York: W.W. Norton, 1979), p. 144.
150 “With the utmost” Ibid., p. 137-138.
151 Ervin read them Washington Post-Los Angeles Times News Service, July 27, 1973. He had already AP, July 24, 1973.
151 Sirica set arguments Siritica, To Set the Record Straight, p. 144.
151 Herbert Kalmbach sat HSCPCA Book 5, pp. 2091-2136.
151 Ehrlichman, who claimed Ibid., Book 6, pp. 2509-2606; Kutler, The Wars of Watergate, p. 373. Viewed at PCM. “not traceable” Ibid., p. 2546.
153 “My advice would” Ibid., p. 2478; viewed on “Bill Moyers Journal: Essay on Watergate,” October 31, 1973. For a sampling of the galvanizing effect this moment had on public discussion of Watergate see Moyers, Ibid.; “End TV Hearings,” CT, August 3, 1973, p. 16, letter from Robert Acomb of Cincinnati; “Rising Up from Watergate,” editorial, The Day, August 1, 1973; and “Long Before Watergate…,” WP, August 23, 1973, p. A15, letter from Peter Just.
153 The conservative Chicago Tribune “An Honorable Calling,” CT, August 2, 1973, p. 12.
153 The masterpiece hadRick Perlstein, Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America (New York: Scribner, 2008), pp. 433-435.
154 He was uncharacteristically HSCPCA Book 7, pp. 2866-2906; Book 8, 3136-3231. Viewed at PCM. “They will have extremely” Ibid., p. 3321.
154 whose pseudonymous thrillersPerlstein, Nixonland, p. 585. And in the memoir: G. Gordon Liddy, Will: The Autobiography of G. Gordon Liddy (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1980), p. 194.
155 “We reject the view” “Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach, Florida,” July 14, 1972, UCSB. It was the spirit: Laura Kalman, Right Star Rising: A New Politics, 1974-1980 (New York: W.W. Norton, 2010), p. 41.
155 Why, a Chicagoan “Praise for Nixon,” CT, July 26, 1973, letter from Mrs. Marie W. Eskridge. “pallbearers for the nation” “Comments on Watergate,” CT, August 9. 1973, p. 16, letter from Joseph M. Chistensen.
155 “alarmingly high percentage” Clarence Petersen, “Lawlessness As Patriotism,” CT, August 26, 1973, p. F5. “holds the future” “40% of Mail from ‘Down Home’ Assails Ervin,” LAT, August 1, 1973, p. 14. quoted the Federalist Papers “Separation of Powers,” WP, August 6, 1973, p. A23, letter from Michael Leibig. complained “that the: “Letters to the Editor,” NYT, September 18, 1973, p. 42, letter from C.W. Griffin. even though “he possesses” “Going Into Government,” WP, August 7, 1973, p. A19, letter from Clara Laurham. “Any President’s true patriotism”: “Letters to the Times,” LAT, July 30. 1973, p. A6, letter from M. Anderson.
155 In April 1970 Katherine A. Scott presentation at the conference “Understanding Richard Nixon and His Era: A Symposium,” Richard Nixon Library, Yorba Linda, California, July 22, 2011.
156 “Abbie had been” David Greenberg, Nixon’s Shadow: The History of an Image (New York: W.W. Norton, 2003), pp. 199.
156 They expanded, too “Watergate on Main Street: Facts Bater their Sense of Trust,” CT, July 24, 1973, p. A1.
156 In a new poll Louis Harris column, July 3, 1973. The favorability ratings: WP, August 25, 1973. Only 17 percent: Kutler, The Wars of Watergate, p. 381. “Apparently,” one dry “Stephen J. Verdier, “Credibility,” WP, August 8, 1973, p. 8.
157 Agnew sent him Jules Witcover, White Knight: The Rise of Spiro Agnew (New York: Random House, 1972), p. 79. Agnew had accepted Ibid., p. 232. until, in October 1969 Perlstein, Nixonland, p. 430. “the cacophony of seditious” John R. Coyne, ed., The Impudent Snobs: Agnew Vs. the Intellectual Establishment (New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, 1972), p. 292.
157 “He was still” AP, June 12, 1973. On August 6 ”Chronology of Agnew Affair,” AP, October 11, 1973. announced on August 7 “Agnew Is Target of Kickback Probe in Baltimore, Proclaims His Innocence,” WP, August 7, 1973, p. A1.
158 “I am innocent” Peter N. Carroll, It Seemed Like Nothing Happened; America in the 1970s (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1990), p. 148.
158 Nixon gave his “Statement About the Watergate Investigations,” August 15, 1973, UCSB. The previous evening William Shawcross, Sideshow: Kissinger, Nixon, and the Destruction of Cambodia (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979); see also “Letter to the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of the Senate About the End of United States Bombing in Cambodia,” August 3, 1973.
158 “Like, for instance” Joseph Kraft column, August 18, 1973.
158 Barry Goldwater Jr: AP, August 16, 1973. A letter writer Lawrence Glasser, “Confidential Relationships,” WP, August 19, 1973, p. C7.
158 Only a little over Kutler, The Wars of Watergate. A habitual presidential: William S. White column, August 26, 1973. Barry Jr.’s dad AP, August 16, 1973.
159 He stepped into “The President’s News Conference,” August 22, 1973, UCSB. the public had UPI, August 1, 1973; See also “Remarks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars National Convention, New Orleans,” August 20. 1973, and August 17, 1973 notes responding to Cambodian cover-up accusations for that speech, RNLPOW, Box 2. This was one of Nixon’s only public speech in August 1973.
158 In August 1973 “Reagan Sees Danger of Inquiry Witch Hunt,” NYT, August 9, 1973, p. 22. He was speaking to young people at a state 4-H convention; Reagan frequently made his most controversial statements before audiences of youth.
158 He managed to excuse UPI, August 3, 1973. In one 1971 “Nixon on Tape: Reagan was ‘Shallow’ and of ‘Limited Mental Capacity,’” Mother Jones, November 15, 2007.
159 David Broder quoted “GOP Left Speechless By Agnew Headlines,” WP, August 8, 1973, p. A1. That contradicted what Stephen Badrich, “Innocent Until Proven?”, WP, August 11, 1973, p. A17.
160 “His message was” AP, August 16, 1973; NBC News, August 16, 1973, VNA. “the best news” Aaron Latham, “Catch ’76,” New York, August 27, 1973, p. 5.
160 Rowland Evans and Robert Novak: ENIR, June 25, 1973.
160 At the annual June Bill Anderson column, “Governors Split—Just on Essentials,” CT, June 6, 1973.
161 Wealthy backers pumped “Reagan Aides Hope for Low Tax Vote,” LAT, September 16, 1973, p. 3; “$436,452 Spent in Qualifying Reagan Tax Measure for Ballot,” LAT, August 1, 1973, p. 3C. Secretary of State Jerry Brown reported, “Records in my office indicate the governor’s tax limitation drive was one of the most costly initiative qualification campaigns ever conducted.”
161 The 5,700 words Lou Cannon, Governor Reagan: His Rise to Power (New York: Public Affairs, 2004), pp. 369-371. Reagan roared backModesto Bee, August 28, 1973.
161 Post had just “Expense Expert: Watchdog Influences California Legislature,” WSJ, June 20. 1973, p. 1. “Alan Post doesn’t” “Post Again Claims Governor’s Plan Will Cause Big Deficits,” Modesto Bee, August 29. 1973.
162 “has lost its right”Modest Bee, September 27, 1973; see also Modesto Bee, September 21, 1973, quote from president of state League of Women Voters: “We hope that the governor will not continue to assume that those who oppose him are ill-informed.” “Apparently, anybody who” UPI, September 22, 1973.
162 He had labeledLos Angeles Sentinel, June 21, 1973.
162 The University of Michigan’s Alexander Hopkins McDannald, ed. Yearbook of the Encyclopedia Americana (New York: Grolliers, 1974) p. 489. in New York a crook “1,800 lbs. of Meat in Hijacked Truck,” CT, August 11, 1973, p. A23. A cartoonist depicte: LAT, August 14, 1973. Another had a newsman: Ibid. A Washingotn Post Thomas J. O’Donnell, “Eatless Mondays,” WP, August 13, 1973, p. A23.
162 the President’s Cost of Living “Gaoline Price Lid Is Upheld,” WP, September 7, p. A1. So Bob Moretti challenged“Moretti Calls Reagan Tax Plan ‘Dangerous,’” Lodi News Sentinel, September 12, 1973; “Reagan Restates ‘No’ to Moretti Debate,” UPI, September 26, 1973.
163 He responded it: James J. Kilpatrick column, June 12, 1973.
163 But then he For contradictory defenses, compare September 21, 1973, Modesto Bee, and “Reagan Gives Pitch for Prop. 1. Before State Bar,” LAT, September 13, 1973, p. A24. “When the advocates” Ibid.; “Reagan Scores Tax Plan Foes,” Santa Cruz Sentinel, September 21, 1973, p. 10.
163 “If the tax revolt” John Chamberlain column, October 5, 1973. Said Edmund G. “Jerry” Brown “Brown Terms Reagan Tax Plan a ‘Hoax,” LAT, September 16, 1973, p. 26. Indeed Reagan said “Reagan Gives Pitch for Prop. 1. Before State Bar,” LAT, September 13, 1973, p. A24.
164 Don Rickles, the bald-headedThe Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts: Fully Roasted: Betty White, Ronald Reagan, Bette Davis (Time/Life Star Vista, 2014).
165 “mass starvation and suicide” UPI, September 21, 1973.
166 “Where were you in ’62” See poster. new nostalgia magazines: Christian Science Monitor Service, January 5, 1974;“New Rip Van Winkle,” Time, February 19, 1973. The Best of Life: “Books: Picture You Upon My Knee,” New York, October 1, 1973, p. 70. the Ground Round: See December 7, 1973 ad. Comic books were “Superman, Howdy ‘Alive’ to Nostalgia Buffs,” CT, August 6, 1973, p. 16. The patriotic belter See the documentary Broad Street Bullies (HBO, 2010).
167 Late in August UPI, August 22, 1973. “Grownups should put” James Ward, “Cheating Always Part of Soap Box Fun,” LAT, September 2, 1973, p. D4.
167 In Chicago, the McDannald, ed. Yearbook of the Encyclopedia Americana. and in Boston: Ibid., p. 144. In Florida, a jury: AP, September 1, 1973.
168 “Tell the students” James R. Buckaloo, “Advice to Students,” LAT, October 4, 1973, p. A6.
168 “a little bit like Watergate” UPI, September 22, 1973. Jerry Brown pointed “Brown Terms Reagan Tax Plan a ‘Hoax,” LAT, September 16, 1973, p. 26.
168 Reagan would say UPI, September 22, 1973. Then his aides “Reagan Scores Tax Plan Foes,” Santa Cruz Sentinel, September 21, 1973, p. 10. “the biggest economic bellyache” Ibid. And that writing “Reagan Gives Pitch for Prop. 1. Before State Bar,” LAT, September 13, 1973, p. A24.
169 “What they mean”: Ibid.
169 The public opinion expert John Chamberlain column, October 5, 1973.
169 Moretti said that See this ABC News report, November 6, 1973. He published an op-edModesto Bee, October 26, 1973.
169 Jimmy the Greek AP, November 3, 1973.
170 In the Pittsburgh “Nixon Writer Backs Political Spying Tactics,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette publication of AP article, September 27, 1973. build a bonfire AP, July 23, 1974.
170 But first, leading See Buchanan’s discussion in opening statement, HSPCA, Book 10, p. 3900-3093.
172 “Anatomy of a Smear” NYT, September 29, 1973, p. 30.
172 “Anatomy of a Lynching Syndrome” NYT, November 9, 1973. Reprinted in National Citizens Committee for Fairnss to the Presidency” ad, November 25, 1973.